The central nervous system of mammals acts as a mutagenic/anti-mutagenic factor: role in microevolution

Результат исследований: Публикации в книгах, отчётах, сборниках, трудах конференцийглава/раздел

1 цитирование (Scopus)

Выдержка

The purpose of this study is to show a bidirectional influence of the mouse pheromones on the genome stability of germ and somatic target cells in conspecific recipients. Using unidentified mixture of pheromones originated from adult animals (males or females) it was revealed that these chemosignals can modify frequencies of different chromosomal disturbances in mitotic and meiotic dividing cells. This finding is important to understand the mechanisms of self-regulation and microevolutionary processes in mouse populations. It can also expand our understanding of the role of the central nervous system and the pathways from the environment to the cell genomes and back to the whole organism and populations in the regulation of the microevolutionary changes in mammals.
Язык оригиналаанглийский
Название основной публикацииGenetics, Evolution and Radiation
ИздательSpringer
Страницы487-495
ISBN (печатное издание)978-3-319-48837-0; 978-3-319-48838-7
DOI
СостояниеОпубликовано - 2017

Отпечаток

Mammals
Central Nervous System
Pheromones
Population
Genome

Цитировать

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abstract = "The purpose of this study is to show a bidirectional influence of the mouse pheromones on the genome stability of germ and somatic target cells in conspecific recipients. Using unidentified mixture of pheromones originated from adult animals (males or females) it was revealed that these chemosignals can modify frequencies of different chromosomal disturbances in mitotic and meiotic dividing cells. This finding is important to understand the mechanisms of self-regulation and microevolutionary processes in mouse populations. It can also expand our understanding of the role of the central nervous system and the pathways from the environment to the cell genomes and back to the whole organism and populations in the regulation of the microevolutionary changes in mammals.",
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The central nervous system of mammals acts as a mutagenic/anti-mutagenic factor: role in microevolution. / Daev, E.V.

Genetics, Evolution and Radiation. Springer, 2017. стр. 487-495.

Результат исследований: Публикации в книгах, отчётах, сборниках, трудах конференцийглава/раздел

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