Development of children adopted to the United States following a social–emotional intervention in St. Petersburg (Russian Federation) institutions

Megan M. Julian, Robert B. McCall, Christina J. Groark, Rifkat J. Muhamedrahimov, Oleg I. Palmov, Natasha V. Nikiforova

Результат исследований: Научные публикации в периодических изданияхстатья

1 цитирование (Scopus)

Выдержка

This study is a post-adoption follow-up of social–emotional interventions in St. Petersburg, Russian Federation Baby Homes (BHs). Children previously resided in BHs and received Care as Usual (CAU, N = 220), Training Only (TO, N = 94), or Training plus Structural Changes (T + SC, N = 45). This study examined intervention effects 0–6.5 years post-adoption to the United States, at age 9 months to 7 years old. Adoptive parents completed questionnaires on their child’s social and behavioral development. Intervention graduates had better attachment security, less indiscriminate friendliness, and fewer behavior problems than CAU graduates. Children who had longer exposure to intervention conditions had better attachment security, but poorer executive function, externalizing and internalizing problems, and competence. Thus, although postinstitutionalized children were generally functioning in the normal range in early childhood and effect sizes were small, a social–emotional intervention in institutions is associated with modest benefits to attachment and behavior problems and apparent decrements to executive function.

Язык оригиналаанглийский
Страницы (с-по)273-293
Число страниц20
ЖурналApplied Developmental Science
Том23
Номер выпуска3
DOI
СостояниеОпубликовано - 3 июл 2019

Отпечаток

adopted child
Child Development
Russia
Executive Function
baby
graduate
Home Care Services
adoptive parents
Mental Competency
Reference Values
structural change
Parents
childhood
questionnaire
Problem Behavior

Предметные области Scopus

  • Психология обучения и развития
  • Науки о продолжительности и качестве жизни
  • Прикладная психология

Цитировать

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abstract = "This study is a post-adoption follow-up of social–emotional interventions in St. Petersburg, Russian Federation Baby Homes (BHs). Children previously resided in BHs and received Care as Usual (CAU, N = 220), Training Only (TO, N = 94), or Training plus Structural Changes (T + SC, N = 45). This study examined intervention effects 0–6.5 years post-adoption to the United States, at age 9 months to 7 years old. Adoptive parents completed questionnaires on their child’s social and behavioral development. Intervention graduates had better attachment security, less indiscriminate friendliness, and fewer behavior problems than CAU graduates. Children who had longer exposure to intervention conditions had better attachment security, but poorer executive function, externalizing and internalizing problems, and competence. Thus, although postinstitutionalized children were generally functioning in the normal range in early childhood and effect sizes were small, a social–emotional intervention in institutions is associated with modest benefits to attachment and behavior problems and apparent decrements to executive function.",
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Development of children adopted to the United States following a social–emotional intervention in St. Petersburg (Russian Federation) institutions. / Julian, Megan M.; McCall, Robert B.; Groark, Christina J.; Muhamedrahimov, Rifkat J.; Palmov, Oleg I.; Nikiforova, Natasha V.

В: Applied Developmental Science, Том 23, № 3, 03.07.2019, стр. 273-293.

Результат исследований: Научные публикации в периодических изданияхстатья

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T1 - Development of children adopted to the United States following a social–emotional intervention in St. Petersburg (Russian Federation) institutions

AU - Julian, Megan M.

AU - McCall, Robert B.

AU - Groark, Christina J.

AU - Muhamedrahimov, Rifkat J.

AU - Palmov, Oleg I.

AU - Nikiforova, Natasha V.

PY - 2019/7/3

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AB - This study is a post-adoption follow-up of social–emotional interventions in St. Petersburg, Russian Federation Baby Homes (BHs). Children previously resided in BHs and received Care as Usual (CAU, N = 220), Training Only (TO, N = 94), or Training plus Structural Changes (T + SC, N = 45). This study examined intervention effects 0–6.5 years post-adoption to the United States, at age 9 months to 7 years old. Adoptive parents completed questionnaires on their child’s social and behavioral development. Intervention graduates had better attachment security, less indiscriminate friendliness, and fewer behavior problems than CAU graduates. Children who had longer exposure to intervention conditions had better attachment security, but poorer executive function, externalizing and internalizing problems, and competence. Thus, although postinstitutionalized children were generally functioning in the normal range in early childhood and effect sizes were small, a social–emotional intervention in institutions is associated with modest benefits to attachment and behavior problems and apparent decrements to executive function.

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KW - YOUNG-CHILDREN

KW - FOSTER-CARE

KW - INTERNATIONAL ADOPTEES

KW - METAANALYTIC EVIDENCE

KW - EXECUTIVE FUNCTION

KW - EARLY ADVERSITY

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JO - Applied Developmental Science

JF - Applied Developmental Science

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