Long-term changes in the role of threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus in the White Sea: predatory fish consumption reflects fluctuating stickleback abundance during the last century

Результат исследований: Научные публикации в периодических изданияхстатья

9 Цитирования (Scopus)

Выдержка

Hypothesis: In the White Sea, predatory fish species have consumed higher proportions of stickleback during historical periods and seasons of high stickleback abundance. Organisms: Adults, juveniles, and eggs of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), together with three species of predatory fishes: cod (Gadus morhua), saffron cod (Eleginus nawaga), and European sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius). Place and times: Kandalaksha Bay, White Sea, Russia; June to August 2011–2014. Analytical methods: Sampling with beach seine (stickleback) and gill nets (predatory fish). Analysis of predatory fish stomach contents (identification to the species level, counting, weighing), and in-depth survey of scientific literature on predatory fish diets over the last century. Results: Near the spawning grounds, stickleback comprise 60% of the summer food of sculpin (adult stickleback), 52% of the diet of cod (adults, juveniles, and eggs), and 15% of the diet of saffron cod (juvenile stickleback). These data resemble obser
Язык оригиналаанглийский
Страницы (с-по)317-334
ЖурналEvolutionary Ecology Research
Том17
СостояниеОпубликовано - 2016

Отпечаток

fish consumption
Gasterosteus aculeatus
Gasterosteidae
long-term change
marine fish
cod (fish)
fish roe
fish
saffron
diet
egg
Cottidae
spawning ground
gillnets
stomach content
Gadus morhua
Russia
beaches
analytical methods
analytical method

Цитировать

@article{85bb7f500e9445b4a8bda1ab2f8e70e2,
title = "Long-term changes in the role of threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus in the White Sea: predatory fish consumption reflects fluctuating stickleback abundance during the last century",
abstract = "Hypothesis: In the White Sea, predatory fish species have consumed higher proportions of stickleback during historical periods and seasons of high stickleback abundance. Organisms: Adults, juveniles, and eggs of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), together with three species of predatory fishes: cod (Gadus morhua), saffron cod (Eleginus nawaga), and European sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius). Place and times: Kandalaksha Bay, White Sea, Russia; June to August 2011–2014. Analytical methods: Sampling with beach seine (stickleback) and gill nets (predatory fish). Analysis of predatory fish stomach contents (identification to the species level, counting, weighing), and in-depth survey of scientific literature on predatory fish diets over the last century. Results: Near the spawning grounds, stickleback comprise 60{\%} of the summer food of sculpin (adult stickleback), 52{\%} of the diet of cod (adults, juveniles, and eggs), and 15{\%} of the diet of saffron cod (juvenile stickleback). These data resemble obser",
keywords = "Atlantic cod, Eleginus nawaga, European sculpin, Gadus morhua, Gasterosteus aculeatus, long-term changes, Myoxocephalus scorpius, predation, saffron cod, threespine stickleback, White Sea.",
author = "Bakhvalova, {A. E.} and Ivanova, {T. S.} and Ivanov, {M. V.} and Demchuk, {A. S.} and Movchan, {E. A.} and Lajus, {D. L.}",
year = "2016",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "317--334",
journal = "Evolutionary Ecology Research",
issn = "1522-0613",
publisher = "Evolutionary Ecology Research",

}

Long-term changes in the role of threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus in the White Sea: predatory fish consumption reflects fluctuating stickleback abundance during the last century. / Bakhvalova, A. E.; Ivanova, T. S.; Ivanov, M. V.; Demchuk, A. S.; Movchan, E. A.; Lajus, D. L.

В: Evolutionary Ecology Research, Том 17, 2016, стр. 317-334.

Результат исследований: Научные публикации в периодических изданияхстатья

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-term changes in the role of threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus in the White Sea: predatory fish consumption reflects fluctuating stickleback abundance during the last century

AU - Bakhvalova, A. E.

AU - Ivanova, T. S.

AU - Ivanov, M. V.

AU - Demchuk, A. S.

AU - Movchan, E. A.

AU - Lajus, D. L.

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Hypothesis: In the White Sea, predatory fish species have consumed higher proportions of stickleback during historical periods and seasons of high stickleback abundance. Organisms: Adults, juveniles, and eggs of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), together with three species of predatory fishes: cod (Gadus morhua), saffron cod (Eleginus nawaga), and European sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius). Place and times: Kandalaksha Bay, White Sea, Russia; June to August 2011–2014. Analytical methods: Sampling with beach seine (stickleback) and gill nets (predatory fish). Analysis of predatory fish stomach contents (identification to the species level, counting, weighing), and in-depth survey of scientific literature on predatory fish diets over the last century. Results: Near the spawning grounds, stickleback comprise 60% of the summer food of sculpin (adult stickleback), 52% of the diet of cod (adults, juveniles, and eggs), and 15% of the diet of saffron cod (juvenile stickleback). These data resemble obser

AB - Hypothesis: In the White Sea, predatory fish species have consumed higher proportions of stickleback during historical periods and seasons of high stickleback abundance. Organisms: Adults, juveniles, and eggs of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), together with three species of predatory fishes: cod (Gadus morhua), saffron cod (Eleginus nawaga), and European sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius). Place and times: Kandalaksha Bay, White Sea, Russia; June to August 2011–2014. Analytical methods: Sampling with beach seine (stickleback) and gill nets (predatory fish). Analysis of predatory fish stomach contents (identification to the species level, counting, weighing), and in-depth survey of scientific literature on predatory fish diets over the last century. Results: Near the spawning grounds, stickleback comprise 60% of the summer food of sculpin (adult stickleback), 52% of the diet of cod (adults, juveniles, and eggs), and 15% of the diet of saffron cod (juvenile stickleback). These data resemble obser

KW - Atlantic cod

KW - Eleginus nawaga

KW - European sculpin

KW - Gadus morhua

KW - Gasterosteus aculeatus

KW - long-term changes

KW - Myoxocephalus scorpius

KW - predation

KW - saffron cod

KW - threespine stickleback

KW - White Sea.

M3 - Article

VL - 17

SP - 317

EP - 334

JO - Evolutionary Ecology Research

JF - Evolutionary Ecology Research

SN - 1522-0613

ER -