Finfish vs jellyfish: complimentary feeding patterns allow threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus and common jellyfish Aurelia aurita to co-exist in a Danish cove

Anastasia Yurtseva, Florian Lüskow, Marion Hatton, Adèle Doucet, Dmitry Lajus

Результат исследований: Научные публикации в периодических изданияхстатья

Выдержка

The threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus and the common jellyfish Aurelia aurita are keystone species in many marine ecosystems, including the shallow cove Kertinge Nor, in Denmark. Both species feed on zooplankton, raising the potential for competition between them. While jellyfish are tactile filtering planktivores, sticklebacks are visual feeders that actively detect, attack and capture prey. The study compared clearance rates (Cl) and tested the hypothesis that jellyfish are more efficient in feeding on small prey and sticklebacks on larger prey animals. Individual (Clind) and population (Clpop) feeding characteristics were studied under good visual conditions. Individual sticklebacks (TL = 44 mm) demonstrated 14–51-fold higher Clind than jellyfish (d = 27 mm) when feeding on small (< 1 mm) and medium (1–4 mm) sized prey and threefold higher Clind when feeding on larger prey (4–11 mm). Clpop was calculated for both species based on their densities in the cove. When consuming small- and medium-sized prey in May–July, Clpop for stickleback was 2–20-fold higher than for jellyfish, but in August following a decrease in fish density, Clpop was higher for jellyfish. This may imply higher predation pressure from stickleback on zooplankton in Kertinge Nor at the beginning of the season, though the common jellyfish was considered earlier as a species controlling zooplankton there. The two competing species likely coexist in the cove due to different seasonal cycles of abundance and thus different seasonal patterns of plankton consumption.

Язык оригиналаанглийский
Номер статьи148
Число страниц15
ЖурналMarine Biology
Том165
Номер выпуска9
DOI
СостояниеОпубликовано - 1 сен 2018

Отпечаток

jellyfish
finfish
Scyphozoa
Gasterosteus aculeatus
Gasterosteidae
fish
zooplankton
fold
planktivore
keystone species
prey capture
clearance rate
cove
marine ecosystem
Denmark
plankton
predation
seasonal variation
animal

Предметные области Scopus

  • Экология, эволюция поведение и систематика
  • Акванаука
  • Экология

Цитировать

@article{e009d035947c444dba4e4099f24bed87,
title = "Finfish vs jellyfish: complimentary feeding patterns allow threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus and common jellyfish Aurelia aurita to co-exist in a Danish cove",
abstract = "The threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus and the common jellyfish Aurelia aurita are keystone species in many marine ecosystems, including the shallow cove Kertinge Nor, in Denmark. Both species feed on zooplankton, raising the potential for competition between them. While jellyfish are tactile filtering planktivores, sticklebacks are visual feeders that actively detect, attack and capture prey. The study compared clearance rates (Cl) and tested the hypothesis that jellyfish are more efficient in feeding on small prey and sticklebacks on larger prey animals. Individual (Clind) and population (Clpop) feeding characteristics were studied under good visual conditions. Individual sticklebacks (TL = 44 mm) demonstrated 14–51-fold higher Clind than jellyfish (d = 27 mm) when feeding on small (< 1 mm) and medium (1–4 mm) sized prey and threefold higher Clind when feeding on larger prey (4–11 mm). Clpop was calculated for both species based on their densities in the cove. When consuming small- and medium-sized prey in May–July, Clpop for stickleback was 2–20-fold higher than for jellyfish, but in August following a decrease in fish density, Clpop was higher for jellyfish. This may imply higher predation pressure from stickleback on zooplankton in Kertinge Nor at the beginning of the season, though the common jellyfish was considered earlier as a species controlling zooplankton there. The two competing species likely coexist in the cove due to different seasonal cycles of abundance and thus different seasonal patterns of plankton consumption.",
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author = "Anastasia Yurtseva and Florian L{\"u}skow and Marion Hatton and Ad{\`e}le Doucet and Dmitry Lajus",
year = "2018",
month = "9",
day = "1",
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Finfish vs jellyfish : complimentary feeding patterns allow threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus and common jellyfish Aurelia aurita to co-exist in a Danish cove. / Yurtseva, Anastasia; Lüskow, Florian; Hatton, Marion; Doucet, Adèle; Lajus, Dmitry.

В: Marine Biology, Том 165, № 9, 148, 01.09.2018.

Результат исследований: Научные публикации в периодических изданияхстатья

TY - JOUR

T1 - Finfish vs jellyfish

T2 - complimentary feeding patterns allow threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus and common jellyfish Aurelia aurita to co-exist in a Danish cove

AU - Yurtseva, Anastasia

AU - Lüskow, Florian

AU - Hatton, Marion

AU - Doucet, Adèle

AU - Lajus, Dmitry

PY - 2018/9/1

Y1 - 2018/9/1

N2 - The threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus and the common jellyfish Aurelia aurita are keystone species in many marine ecosystems, including the shallow cove Kertinge Nor, in Denmark. Both species feed on zooplankton, raising the potential for competition between them. While jellyfish are tactile filtering planktivores, sticklebacks are visual feeders that actively detect, attack and capture prey. The study compared clearance rates (Cl) and tested the hypothesis that jellyfish are more efficient in feeding on small prey and sticklebacks on larger prey animals. Individual (Clind) and population (Clpop) feeding characteristics were studied under good visual conditions. Individual sticklebacks (TL = 44 mm) demonstrated 14–51-fold higher Clind than jellyfish (d = 27 mm) when feeding on small (< 1 mm) and medium (1–4 mm) sized prey and threefold higher Clind when feeding on larger prey (4–11 mm). Clpop was calculated for both species based on their densities in the cove. When consuming small- and medium-sized prey in May–July, Clpop for stickleback was 2–20-fold higher than for jellyfish, but in August following a decrease in fish density, Clpop was higher for jellyfish. This may imply higher predation pressure from stickleback on zooplankton in Kertinge Nor at the beginning of the season, though the common jellyfish was considered earlier as a species controlling zooplankton there. The two competing species likely coexist in the cove due to different seasonal cycles of abundance and thus different seasonal patterns of plankton consumption.

AB - The threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus and the common jellyfish Aurelia aurita are keystone species in many marine ecosystems, including the shallow cove Kertinge Nor, in Denmark. Both species feed on zooplankton, raising the potential for competition between them. While jellyfish are tactile filtering planktivores, sticklebacks are visual feeders that actively detect, attack and capture prey. The study compared clearance rates (Cl) and tested the hypothesis that jellyfish are more efficient in feeding on small prey and sticklebacks on larger prey animals. Individual (Clind) and population (Clpop) feeding characteristics were studied under good visual conditions. Individual sticklebacks (TL = 44 mm) demonstrated 14–51-fold higher Clind than jellyfish (d = 27 mm) when feeding on small (< 1 mm) and medium (1–4 mm) sized prey and threefold higher Clind when feeding on larger prey (4–11 mm). Clpop was calculated for both species based on their densities in the cove. When consuming small- and medium-sized prey in May–July, Clpop for stickleback was 2–20-fold higher than for jellyfish, but in August following a decrease in fish density, Clpop was higher for jellyfish. This may imply higher predation pressure from stickleback on zooplankton in Kertinge Nor at the beginning of the season, though the common jellyfish was considered earlier as a species controlling zooplankton there. The two competing species likely coexist in the cove due to different seasonal cycles of abundance and thus different seasonal patterns of plankton consumption.

KW - CTENOPHORE MNEMIOPSIS-LEIDYI

KW - CAPELIN MALLOTUS-VILLOSUS

KW - SIZE-SELECTIVE PREDATION

KW - HERRING CLUPEA-HARENGUS

KW - 3-SPINED STICKLEBACK

KW - BALTIC SEA

KW - PREY SELECTIVITY

KW - ZOOPLANKTON COMMUNITY

KW - OXYGEN CONCENTRATIONS

KW - CLEARANCE RATES

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JO - Marine Biology

JF - Marine Biology

SN - 0025-3162

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