Differential roles of the right and left brain hemispheres in the social interactions of a free-ranging ungulate

Результат исследований: Научные публикации в периодических изданияхстатья

Выдержка

Despite the abundant empirical evidence on lateralized social behaviours, a clear understanding of the relative roles of two brain hemispheres in social processing is still lacking. This study investigated visual lateralization in social interactions of free-ranging European bison (Bison bonasus). The bison were more likely to display aggressive responses (such as fight and side hit), when they viewed the conspecific with the right visual field, implicating the left brain hemisphere. In contrast, the responses associated with positive social interactions (female-to-calf bonding, calf-to-female approach, suckling) or aggression inhibition (fight termination) occurred more likely when the left visual field was in use, indicating the right hemisphere advantage. The results do not support either assumptions of right-hemisphere dominance for control of various social functions or hypotheses about simple positive (approach) versus negative (withdrawal) distinction between the hemispheric roles. The discrepancy between the studies suggests that in animals, the relative roles of the hemispheres in social processing may be determined by a fine balance of emotions and motivations associated with the particular social reaction difficult to categorize for a human investigator. Our findings highlight the involvement of both brain hemispheres in the control of social behaviour.

Язык оригиналаанглийский
Номер статьи103959
ЖурналBehavioural Processes
Том168
Ранняя дата в режиме онлайн9 сен 2019
DOI
СостояниеОпубликовано - ноя 2019

Отпечаток

Bison
Interpersonal Relations
ungulates
Bison bonasus
Social Behavior
Visual Fields
social behavior
brain
Brain
attachment behavior
calves
bison
emotions
Aggression
suckling
Motivation
aggression
Emotions
Research Personnel
animals

Предметные области Scopus

  • Зоология и животноводство
  • Певеденческая неврология

Цитировать

@article{1188680fc6324c29a682e7ac11f1396c,
title = "Differential roles of the right and left brain hemispheres in the social interactions of a free-ranging ungulate",
abstract = "Despite the abundant empirical evidence on lateralized social behaviours, a clear understanding of the relative roles of two brain hemispheres in social processing is still lacking. This study investigated visual lateralization in social interactions of free-ranging European bison (Bison bonasus). The bison were more likely to display aggressive responses (such as fight and side hit), when they viewed the conspecific with the right visual field, implicating the left brain hemisphere. In contrast, the responses associated with positive social interactions (female-to-calf bonding, calf-to-female approach, suckling) or aggression inhibition (fight termination) occurred more likely when the left visual field was in use, indicating the right hemisphere advantage. The results do not support either assumptions of right-hemisphere dominance for control of various social functions or hypotheses about simple positive (approach) versus negative (withdrawal) distinction between the hemispheric roles. The discrepancy between the studies suggests that in animals, the relative roles of the hemispheres in social processing may be determined by a fine balance of emotions and motivations associated with the particular social reaction difficult to categorize for a human investigator. Our findings highlight the involvement of both brain hemispheres in the control of social behaviour.",
keywords = "Bovid, Brain asymmetry, Eye preference, Hemispheric specialization, Laterality, Ungulate",
author = "Andrey Giljov and Karina Karenina",
year = "2019",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1016/j.beproc.2019.103959",
language = "English",
volume = "168",
journal = "Behavioural Processes",
issn = "0376-6357",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

Differential roles of the right and left brain hemispheres in the social interactions of a free-ranging ungulate. / Giljov, Andrey; Karenina, Karina.

В: Behavioural Processes, Том 168, 103959, 11.2019.

Результат исследований: Научные публикации в периодических изданияхстатья

TY - JOUR

T1 - Differential roles of the right and left brain hemispheres in the social interactions of a free-ranging ungulate

AU - Giljov, Andrey

AU - Karenina, Karina

PY - 2019/11

Y1 - 2019/11

N2 - Despite the abundant empirical evidence on lateralized social behaviours, a clear understanding of the relative roles of two brain hemispheres in social processing is still lacking. This study investigated visual lateralization in social interactions of free-ranging European bison (Bison bonasus). The bison were more likely to display aggressive responses (such as fight and side hit), when they viewed the conspecific with the right visual field, implicating the left brain hemisphere. In contrast, the responses associated with positive social interactions (female-to-calf bonding, calf-to-female approach, suckling) or aggression inhibition (fight termination) occurred more likely when the left visual field was in use, indicating the right hemisphere advantage. The results do not support either assumptions of right-hemisphere dominance for control of various social functions or hypotheses about simple positive (approach) versus negative (withdrawal) distinction between the hemispheric roles. The discrepancy between the studies suggests that in animals, the relative roles of the hemispheres in social processing may be determined by a fine balance of emotions and motivations associated with the particular social reaction difficult to categorize for a human investigator. Our findings highlight the involvement of both brain hemispheres in the control of social behaviour.

AB - Despite the abundant empirical evidence on lateralized social behaviours, a clear understanding of the relative roles of two brain hemispheres in social processing is still lacking. This study investigated visual lateralization in social interactions of free-ranging European bison (Bison bonasus). The bison were more likely to display aggressive responses (such as fight and side hit), when they viewed the conspecific with the right visual field, implicating the left brain hemisphere. In contrast, the responses associated with positive social interactions (female-to-calf bonding, calf-to-female approach, suckling) or aggression inhibition (fight termination) occurred more likely when the left visual field was in use, indicating the right hemisphere advantage. The results do not support either assumptions of right-hemisphere dominance for control of various social functions or hypotheses about simple positive (approach) versus negative (withdrawal) distinction between the hemispheric roles. The discrepancy between the studies suggests that in animals, the relative roles of the hemispheres in social processing may be determined by a fine balance of emotions and motivations associated with the particular social reaction difficult to categorize for a human investigator. Our findings highlight the involvement of both brain hemispheres in the control of social behaviour.

KW - Bovid

KW - Brain asymmetry

KW - Eye preference

KW - Hemispheric specialization

KW - Laterality

KW - Ungulate

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85072030025&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.beproc.2019.103959

DO - 10.1016/j.beproc.2019.103959

M3 - Article

C2 - 31513830

AN - SCOPUS:85072030025

VL - 168

JO - Behavioural Processes

JF - Behavioural Processes

SN - 0376-6357

M1 - 103959

ER -