Climate warming as a possible trigger of keystone mussel population decline in oligotrophic rivers at the continental scale

I.N. Bolotov, A.A. Makhrov, M.Y. Gofarov, O.V. Aksenova, P.E. Aspholm, Y. Bespalaya, M.V. Kabakov, Y.S. Kolosova, A.V. Kondakov, T. Ofenböck, A.N. Ostrovsky, I.Yu. Popov, T. von Proschwitz, M. Rudzite, M. Rudzitis, S.E. Sokolova, I. Valovirta, I.V. Vikhrev, M.V. Vinarsky, A.A. Zotin

Результат исследований: Научные публикации в периодических изданияхстатьянаучнаярецензирование

4 Цитирования (Scopus)

Выдержка

The effects of climate change on oligotrophic rivers and their communities are almost unknown, albeit these ecosystems are the primary habitat of the critically endangered freshwater pearl mussel and its host fishes, salmonids. The distribution and abundance of pearl mussels have drastically decreased throughout Europe over the last century, particularly within the southern part of the range, but causes of this wide-scale extinction process are unclear. Here we estimate the effects of climate change on pearl mussels based on historical and recent samples from 50 rivers and 6 countries across Europe. We found that the shell convexity may be considered an indicator of the thermal effects on pearl
mussel populations under warming climate because it reflects shifts in summer temperatures and is significantly different in viable and declining populations. Spatial and temporal modeling of the relationship between shell convexity and population status show that global climate change could have accelerated the population decline of pearl mussels over the last 100 years through rapidly decreasing suitable distribution areas. Simulation predicts future warming-induced range reduction, particularly in southern regions. These results highlight the importance of large-scale studies of keystone species, which can underscore the hidden effects of climate warming on freshwater ecosystems.
Язык оригиналаанглийский
Страницы (с-по)1-9
Число страниц9
ЖурналScientific Reports
Том8
Номер выпуска35
DOI
СостояниеОпубликовано - янв 2018

Цитировать

Bolotov, I. N., Makhrov, A. A., Gofarov, M. Y., Aksenova, O. V., Aspholm, P. E., Bespalaya, Y., ... Zotin, A. A. (2018). Climate warming as a possible trigger of keystone mussel population decline in oligotrophic rivers at the continental scale. Scientific Reports, 8(35), 1-9. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-18873-y
Bolotov, I.N. ; Makhrov, A.A. ; Gofarov, M.Y. ; Aksenova, O.V. ; Aspholm, P.E. ; Bespalaya, Y. ; Kabakov, M.V. ; Kolosova, Y.S. ; Kondakov, A.V. ; Ofenböck, T. ; Ostrovsky, A.N. ; Popov, I.Yu. ; von Proschwitz, T. ; Rudzite, M. ; Rudzitis, M. ; Sokolova, S.E. ; Valovirta, I. ; Vikhrev, I.V. ; Vinarsky, M.V. ; Zotin, A.A. / Climate warming as a possible trigger of keystone mussel population decline in oligotrophic rivers at the continental scale. В: Scientific Reports. 2018 ; Том 8, № 35. стр. 1-9.
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title = "Climate warming as a possible trigger of keystone mussel population decline in oligotrophic rivers at the continental scale",
abstract = "The effects of climate change on oligotrophic rivers and their communities are almost unknown, albeit these ecosystems are the primary habitat of the critically endangered freshwater pearl mussel and its host fishes, salmonids. The distribution and abundance of pearl mussels have drastically decreased throughout Europe over the last century, particularly within the southern part of the range, but causes of this wide-scale extinction process are unclear. Here we estimate the effects of climate change on pearl mussels based on historical and recent samples from 50 rivers and 6 countries across Europe. We found that the shell convexity may be considered an indicator of the thermal effects on pearlmussel populations under warming climate because it reflects shifts in summer temperatures and is significantly different in viable and declining populations. Spatial and temporal modeling of the relationship between shell convexity and population status show that global climate change could have accelerated the population decline of pearl mussels over the last 100 years through rapidly decreasing suitable distribution areas. Simulation predicts future warming-induced range reduction, particularly in southern regions. These results highlight the importance of large-scale studies of keystone species, which can underscore the hidden effects of climate warming on freshwater ecosystems.",
author = "I.N. Bolotov and A.A. Makhrov and M.Y. Gofarov and O.V. Aksenova and P.E. Aspholm and Y. Bespalaya and M.V. Kabakov and Y.S. Kolosova and A.V. Kondakov and T. Ofenb{\"o}ck and A.N. Ostrovsky and I.Yu. Popov and {von Proschwitz}, T. and M. Rudzite and M. Rudzitis and S.E. Sokolova and I. Valovirta and I.V. Vikhrev and M.V. Vinarsky and A.A. Zotin",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1038/s41598-017-18873-y",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "1--9",
journal = "Scientific Reports",
issn = "2045-2322",
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Bolotov, IN, Makhrov, AA, Gofarov, MY, Aksenova, OV, Aspholm, PE, Bespalaya, Y, Kabakov, MV, Kolosova, YS, Kondakov, AV, Ofenböck, T, Ostrovsky, AN, Popov, IY, von Proschwitz, T, Rudzite, M, Rudzitis, M, Sokolova, SE, Valovirta, I, Vikhrev, IV, Vinarsky, MV & Zotin, AA 2018, 'Climate warming as a possible trigger of keystone mussel population decline in oligotrophic rivers at the continental scale' Scientific Reports, том. 8, № 35, стр. 1-9. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-18873-y

Climate warming as a possible trigger of keystone mussel population decline in oligotrophic rivers at the continental scale. / Bolotov, I.N.; Makhrov, A.A.; Gofarov, M.Y.; Aksenova, O.V.; Aspholm, P.E.; Bespalaya, Y.; Kabakov, M.V.; Kolosova, Y.S.; Kondakov, A.V.; Ofenböck, T.; Ostrovsky, A.N.; Popov, I.Yu.; von Proschwitz, T.; Rudzite, M.; Rudzitis, M.; Sokolova, S.E.; Valovirta, I.; Vikhrev, I.V.; Vinarsky, M.V.; Zotin, A.A.

В: Scientific Reports, Том 8, № 35, 01.2018, стр. 1-9.

Результат исследований: Научные публикации в периодических изданияхстатьянаучнаярецензирование

TY - JOUR

T1 - Climate warming as a possible trigger of keystone mussel population decline in oligotrophic rivers at the continental scale

AU - Bolotov, I.N.

AU - Makhrov, A.A.

AU - Gofarov, M.Y.

AU - Aksenova, O.V.

AU - Aspholm, P.E.

AU - Bespalaya, Y.

AU - Kabakov, M.V.

AU - Kolosova, Y.S.

AU - Kondakov, A.V.

AU - Ofenböck, T.

AU - Ostrovsky, A.N.

AU - Popov, I.Yu.

AU - von Proschwitz, T.

AU - Rudzite, M.

AU - Rudzitis, M.

AU - Sokolova, S.E.

AU - Valovirta, I.

AU - Vikhrev, I.V.

AU - Vinarsky, M.V.

AU - Zotin, A.A.

PY - 2018/1

Y1 - 2018/1

N2 - The effects of climate change on oligotrophic rivers and their communities are almost unknown, albeit these ecosystems are the primary habitat of the critically endangered freshwater pearl mussel and its host fishes, salmonids. The distribution and abundance of pearl mussels have drastically decreased throughout Europe over the last century, particularly within the southern part of the range, but causes of this wide-scale extinction process are unclear. Here we estimate the effects of climate change on pearl mussels based on historical and recent samples from 50 rivers and 6 countries across Europe. We found that the shell convexity may be considered an indicator of the thermal effects on pearlmussel populations under warming climate because it reflects shifts in summer temperatures and is significantly different in viable and declining populations. Spatial and temporal modeling of the relationship between shell convexity and population status show that global climate change could have accelerated the population decline of pearl mussels over the last 100 years through rapidly decreasing suitable distribution areas. Simulation predicts future warming-induced range reduction, particularly in southern regions. These results highlight the importance of large-scale studies of keystone species, which can underscore the hidden effects of climate warming on freshwater ecosystems.

AB - The effects of climate change on oligotrophic rivers and their communities are almost unknown, albeit these ecosystems are the primary habitat of the critically endangered freshwater pearl mussel and its host fishes, salmonids. The distribution and abundance of pearl mussels have drastically decreased throughout Europe over the last century, particularly within the southern part of the range, but causes of this wide-scale extinction process are unclear. Here we estimate the effects of climate change on pearl mussels based on historical and recent samples from 50 rivers and 6 countries across Europe. We found that the shell convexity may be considered an indicator of the thermal effects on pearlmussel populations under warming climate because it reflects shifts in summer temperatures and is significantly different in viable and declining populations. Spatial and temporal modeling of the relationship between shell convexity and population status show that global climate change could have accelerated the population decline of pearl mussels over the last 100 years through rapidly decreasing suitable distribution areas. Simulation predicts future warming-induced range reduction, particularly in southern regions. These results highlight the importance of large-scale studies of keystone species, which can underscore the hidden effects of climate warming on freshwater ecosystems.

U2 - 10.1038/s41598-017-18873-y

DO - 10.1038/s41598-017-18873-y

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - 1

EP - 9

JO - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

SN - 2045-2322

IS - 35

ER -