Geological controls and the impact of human society on the composition of peloids of present-day salt lakes: coastal zones of the Black, Azov, and Dead Seas

Переведенное название: Геологический контроль и влияние человеческого общества на состав пелоидов современных соленых озер: прибрежные зоны Черного, Азовского и Мёртвого морей

Результат исследований: Научные публикации в периодических изданияхстатья

1 цитирование (Scopus)

Выдержка

Modern salt lakes belong to a growing class of natural systems undergoing compositional change due to increased human activity along their shores. To understand the full consequence of anthropogenic-driven change, detailed geological and geochemical study of such salt lake systems is required. Notably further study is required of the changes recorded in the peloids (lake muds) commonly found in these salt lake systems. Differences in regional geology respectively determine the dominant sulphate mineralsalt type and chemical composition of Crimean salt lake peloids, and the chloridecarbonate mineral-salt type and chlorine-calcium composition of the Dead Sea peloids. Local geological factors furthermore influence the peloids’ geochemical and grain size characteristics: Cu-Rb-Zn-Mo-Ca-Cl association is found in Dead Sea peloids and Fe-V-Mn-Co-Y-Pb association is found in Crimean lake muds. Finally, the beddingstructure of the peloid layer affects the granulometric characteristics of the peloids. The impact of human society (e.g., the anthropogenic factor) influences the salt, granulometric and microelemental compositions of peloids. A complete lack of halite in the Lake Kuchuk-Adzhigol mud is most likely related to intensive anthropogenic desalination, as well as to the input of drainage and waste water. The coarsest muds were found in Lake Saky, which reflects changes in the hydrochemical regime of the lake. Ferrous sediments of the Cimmerian stage are widespread in the East of Crimea. Until recently, these deposits were exploited through open pit mining (e.g., the iron ore mine Kamish-Burun), which could amplify Fe-Ti-Cr-K-V-Pb-Y-Mn-As-Co association in the Lake Tobechik muds.
Язык оригиналаанглийский
Страницы (с-по)843-855
Число страниц13
ЖурналJournal of Coastal Conservation
Том23
Номер выпуска4
Ранняя дата в режиме онлайн12 апр 2019
DOI
СостояниеОпубликовано - 1 авг 2019

Предметные области Scopus

  • Океанография
  • Экология
  • Природа и охрана ландшафта

Цитировать

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title = "Geological controls and the impact of human society on the composition of peloids of present-day salt lakes: coastal zones of the Black, Azov, and Dead Seas",
abstract = "Modern salt lakes belong to a growing class of natural systems undergoing compositional change due to increased human activity along their shores. To understand the full consequence of anthropogenic-driven change, detailed geological and geochemical study of such salt lake systems is required. Notably further study is required of the changes recorded in the peloids (lake muds) commonly found in these salt lake systems. Differences in regional geology respectively determine the dominant sulphate mineralsalt type and chemical composition of Crimean salt lake peloids, and the chloridecarbonate mineral-salt type and chlorine-calcium composition of the Dead Sea peloids. Local geological factors furthermore influence the peloids’ geochemical and grain size characteristics: Cu-Rb-Zn-Mo-Ca-Cl association is found in Dead Sea peloids and Fe-V-Mn-Co-Y-Pb association is found in Crimean lake muds. Finally, the beddingstructure of the peloid layer affects the granulometric characteristics of the peloids. The impact of human society (e.g., the anthropogenic factor) influences the salt, granulometric and microelemental compositions of peloids. A complete lack of halite in the Lake Kuchuk-Adzhigol mud is most likely related to intensive anthropogenic desalination, as well as to the input of drainage and waste water. The coarsest muds were found in Lake Saky, which reflects changes in the hydrochemical regime of the lake. Ferrous sediments of the Cimmerian stage are widespread in the East of Crimea. Until recently, these deposits were exploited through open pit mining (e.g., the iron ore mine Kamish-Burun), which could amplify Fe-Ti-Cr-K-V-Pb-Y-Mn-As-Co association in the Lake Tobechik muds.",
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Geological controls and the impact of human society on the composition of peloids of present-day salt lakes : coastal zones of the Black, Azov, and Dead Seas. / Kotov, S. ; Kotova, I. ; Kayukova, E. .

В: Journal of Coastal Conservation, Том 23, № 4, 01.08.2019, стр. 843-855.

Результат исследований: Научные публикации в периодических изданияхстатья

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T1 - Geological controls and the impact of human society on the composition of peloids of present-day salt lakes

T2 - coastal zones of the Black, Azov, and Dead Seas

AU - Kotov, S.

AU - Kotova, I.

AU - Kayukova, E.

PY - 2019/8/1

Y1 - 2019/8/1

N2 - Modern salt lakes belong to a growing class of natural systems undergoing compositional change due to increased human activity along their shores. To understand the full consequence of anthropogenic-driven change, detailed geological and geochemical study of such salt lake systems is required. Notably further study is required of the changes recorded in the peloids (lake muds) commonly found in these salt lake systems. Differences in regional geology respectively determine the dominant sulphate mineralsalt type and chemical composition of Crimean salt lake peloids, and the chloridecarbonate mineral-salt type and chlorine-calcium composition of the Dead Sea peloids. Local geological factors furthermore influence the peloids’ geochemical and grain size characteristics: Cu-Rb-Zn-Mo-Ca-Cl association is found in Dead Sea peloids and Fe-V-Mn-Co-Y-Pb association is found in Crimean lake muds. Finally, the beddingstructure of the peloid layer affects the granulometric characteristics of the peloids. The impact of human society (e.g., the anthropogenic factor) influences the salt, granulometric and microelemental compositions of peloids. A complete lack of halite in the Lake Kuchuk-Adzhigol mud is most likely related to intensive anthropogenic desalination, as well as to the input of drainage and waste water. The coarsest muds were found in Lake Saky, which reflects changes in the hydrochemical regime of the lake. Ferrous sediments of the Cimmerian stage are widespread in the East of Crimea. Until recently, these deposits were exploited through open pit mining (e.g., the iron ore mine Kamish-Burun), which could amplify Fe-Ti-Cr-K-V-Pb-Y-Mn-As-Co association in the Lake Tobechik muds.

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KW - Anthropogenic factors

KW - Coastal zones

KW - Crimean peninsular

KW - Lake sediments

KW - Peloids

KW - The Dead Sea

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