Species Composition and Population Dynamics of Dominant Dendrophagous Moths (Lepidoptera) in St. Petersburg and Its Environs

A. V. Selikhovkin, S. V. Baryshnikova, N. V. Denisova, Yu A. Timofeeva

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Abstract

The paper summarizes new and literature data on the species composition, trophic relationships, and population dynamics of phyllophagous lepidopterans dominant on woody plants in St. Petersburg and its environs (Russia). Most of these species have concealed larvae (e.g., leaf miners and leaf rollers), and some of them are invasive. The data were accumulated during approximately a hundred years of observations and field collections. Concealed species form the dominant group within the studied complex of phyllophagous moths in St. Petersburg and Leningrad Province (27 species from 13 families). Changes in the composition of dominant pests of the dog rose, bird cherry, elm, poplar, and other woody plants have been recorded. Outbreaks of some species, such as Phyllonorycter salicicolella (Gracillariidae), Archips rosana (Tortricidae), Leucoma salicis, Lymantria monacha, and Orgyia antiqua (Erebidae), were recorded during the XX century but since about 1980 the population density of these species has remained at a very low level. Another group of species, which includes Phyllonorycter populifoliella (Gracillariidae), Batrachedra praeangusta (Batrachedridae), Acleris bergmanniana, and Epinotia abbreviana (Tortricidae), demonstrated a sharp increase in population density in the 1990–2000s, a phenomenon which had not been observed before. The possible causes of such population dynamics are discussed. The dominant species of phyllophagous micro-lepidopterans, including some recent invaders (e.g., Cameraria ohridella and Phyllonorycter issikii, Gracillariidae) and adventive species (e.g., Ph. populifoliella and Ph. acerifoliella, Gracillariidae) pose a serious threat to woody plants in St. Petersburg and Leningrad Province.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)963-978
Number of pages16
JournalEntomological Review
Volume98
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2018

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Gracillariidae
Phyllonorycter populifoliella
moths
population dynamics
Lepidoptera
woody plants
Phyllonorycter
species diversity
Tortricidae
Leucoma salicis
Acleris
Orgyia antiqua
Archips
Epinotia
population density
Lymantria monacha
Cameraria ohridella
Rosa canina
leafrollers
leafminers

Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science

Cite this

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title = "Species Composition and Population Dynamics of Dominant Dendrophagous Moths (Lepidoptera) in St. Petersburg and Its Environs",
abstract = "The paper summarizes new and literature data on the species composition, trophic relationships, and population dynamics of phyllophagous lepidopterans dominant on woody plants in St. Petersburg and its environs (Russia). Most of these species have concealed larvae (e.g., leaf miners and leaf rollers), and some of them are invasive. The data were accumulated during approximately a hundred years of observations and field collections. Concealed species form the dominant group within the studied complex of phyllophagous moths in St. Petersburg and Leningrad Province (27 species from 13 families). Changes in the composition of dominant pests of the dog rose, bird cherry, elm, poplar, and other woody plants have been recorded. Outbreaks of some species, such as Phyllonorycter salicicolella (Gracillariidae), Archips rosana (Tortricidae), Leucoma salicis, Lymantria monacha, and Orgyia antiqua (Erebidae), were recorded during the XX century but since about 1980 the population density of these species has remained at a very low level. Another group of species, which includes Phyllonorycter populifoliella (Gracillariidae), Batrachedra praeangusta (Batrachedridae), Acleris bergmanniana, and Epinotia abbreviana (Tortricidae), demonstrated a sharp increase in population density in the 1990–2000s, a phenomenon which had not been observed before. The possible causes of such population dynamics are discussed. The dominant species of phyllophagous micro-lepidopterans, including some recent invaders (e.g., Cameraria ohridella and Phyllonorycter issikii, Gracillariidae) and adventive species (e.g., Ph. populifoliella and Ph. acerifoliella, Gracillariidae) pose a serious threat to woody plants in St. Petersburg and Leningrad Province.",
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Species Composition and Population Dynamics of Dominant Dendrophagous Moths (Lepidoptera) in St. Petersburg and Its Environs. / Selikhovkin, A. V.; Baryshnikova, S. V.; Denisova, N. V.; Timofeeva, Yu A.

In: Entomological Review, Vol. 98, No. 8, 01.11.2018, p. 963-978.

Research output

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