Planning for a sustainable arctic: Regional development in the yamalo-nenets autonomous okrug (Russia)

Daria Gritsenko, Elena Efimova

Research output

Abstract

In the framework of regional sustainable development (RSD), reconciling economic, social, and ecological goals and activities is one of the top priorities for policy-makers involved in regional planning (Coelho et al. 2010). Public regulators who define the “rules of the game” for public and private companies need to interpret and operationalize sustainable development (SD) before it can enter policy practice. A typical approach is to develop a system of sustainability indicators that can determine whether the past growth of an economy has been sustainable. Regional planners can design SD indicators that account for regional specificity to inform future policy choices (Van Zeijl-Rozema et al. 2011). For instance, a region’s location, size, or available factors of production could have an impact on the community’s values, concerns, and options for the future (Gustavson et al. 1999; Coelho et al. 2010). The special properties of the Arctic regions, such as remoteness from the centers of production and consumption, ultra-small population, and resource abundance coupled with the fragile Arctic nature require adequate treatment when developing and analyzing pathways toward sustainable development.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationRussia's Far North
Subtitle of host publicationThe Contested Energy Frontier
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Pages67-83
Number of pages17
ISBN (Electronic)9781351349024
ISBN (Print)9781138307544
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

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Arctic
regional development
sustainable development
Russia
planning
regional planner
regional planning
sustainability
economy
resources
economics
Values

Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Gritsenko, D., & Efimova, E. (2018). Planning for a sustainable arctic: Regional development in the yamalo-nenets autonomous okrug (Russia). In Russia's Far North: The Contested Energy Frontier (pp. 67-83). Taylor & Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315121772
Gritsenko, Daria ; Efimova, Elena. / Planning for a sustainable arctic : Regional development in the yamalo-nenets autonomous okrug (Russia). Russia's Far North: The Contested Energy Frontier. Taylor & Francis, 2018. pp. 67-83
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Gritsenko, D & Efimova, E 2018, Planning for a sustainable arctic: Regional development in the yamalo-nenets autonomous okrug (Russia). in Russia's Far North: The Contested Energy Frontier. Taylor & Francis, pp. 67-83. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315121772

Planning for a sustainable arctic : Regional development in the yamalo-nenets autonomous okrug (Russia). / Gritsenko, Daria; Efimova, Elena.

Russia's Far North: The Contested Energy Frontier. Taylor & Francis, 2018. p. 67-83.

Research output

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Gritsenko D, Efimova E. Planning for a sustainable arctic: Regional development in the yamalo-nenets autonomous okrug (Russia). In Russia's Far North: The Contested Energy Frontier. Taylor & Francis. 2018. p. 67-83 https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315121772