MVPA analysis of intertrial phase coherence of neuromagnetic responses to words reliably classifies multiple levels of language processing in the brain

Mads Jensen, Rasha Hyder, Юрий Юрьевич Штыров

Research output

Abstract

Neural processing of language is still among the most poorly understood functions of the human brain, whereas a need to objectively assess the neurocongitve status of the language function in a participant-friendly and noninvasive fashion arises in various situations. Here, we propose a solution for this based on a short task-free recording of MEG responses to a set of spoken linguistic contrasts. We used spoken stimuli that diverged lexically (words/pseudowords), semantically (action-related/abstract) or morphosyntactically (grammatically correct/ungrammatical). Based on beamformer source reconstruction we investigated inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC) in five canonical bands (alpha, beta, and low, medium and high gamma) using multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA). Using this approach, we could successfully classify brain responses to meaningful words from meaningless pseudowords, correct from incorrect syntax, as well as semantic differences. The best classification results indicated distributed patterns of activity dominated by core temporofrontal language circuits and complemented by other areas. They varied between the different neurolinguistic properties across frequency bands, with lexical processes classified predominantly by broad gamma, semantic distinctions - by alpha and beta, and syntax - by low gamma feature patterns. Crucially, all types of processing commenced in a near-parallel fashion from similar to 100 ms after the auditory information allowed for disambiguating the spoken input. This shows that individual neurolinguistic properties take place simultaneously and involve overlapping yet distinct neuronal networks that operate at different frequency bands. This brings further hope that brain imaging can be used to assess neurolinguistic processes objectively and noninvasively in a range of populations.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberUNSP ENEURO.0444-18.2019
Number of pages56
JournaleNeuro
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Cite this

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title = "MVPA analysis of intertrial phase coherence of neuromagnetic responses to words reliably classifies multiple levels of language processing in the brain",
abstract = "Neural processing of language is still among the most poorly understood functions of the human brain, whereas a need to objectively assess the neurocongitve status of the language function in a participant-friendly and noninvasive fashion arises in various situations. Here, we propose a solution for this based on a short task-free recording of MEG responses to a set of spoken linguistic contrasts. We used spoken stimuli that diverged lexically (words/pseudowords), semantically (action-related/abstract) or morphosyntactically (grammatically correct/ungrammatical). Based on beamformer source reconstruction we investigated inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC) in five canonical bands (alpha, beta, and low, medium and high gamma) using multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA). Using this approach, we could successfully classify brain responses to meaningful words from meaningless pseudowords, correct from incorrect syntax, as well as semantic differences. The best classification results indicated distributed patterns of activity dominated by core temporofrontal language circuits and complemented by other areas. They varied between the different neurolinguistic properties across frequency bands, with lexical processes classified predominantly by broad gamma, semantic distinctions - by alpha and beta, and syntax - by low gamma feature patterns. Crucially, all types of processing commenced in a near-parallel fashion from similar to 100 ms after the auditory information allowed for disambiguating the spoken input. This shows that individual neurolinguistic properties take place simultaneously and involve overlapping yet distinct neuronal networks that operate at different frequency bands. This brings further hope that brain imaging can be used to assess neurolinguistic processes objectively and noninvasively in a range of populations.",
keywords = "CORTICAL MOTOR SYSTEMS, MISMATCH NEGATIVITY, TELL US, OSCILLATIONS, POTENTIALS, SPEECH, GAMMA, COMPREHENSION, INFORMATION, ATTENTION",
author = "Mads Jensen and Rasha Hyder and Штыров, {Юрий Юрьевич}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1523/ENEURO.0444-18.2019",
language = "Английский",
volume = "6",
journal = "eNeuro",
issn = "2373-2822",
publisher = "Society for Neuroscience",
number = "4",

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T1 - MVPA analysis of intertrial phase coherence of neuromagnetic responses to words reliably classifies multiple levels of language processing in the brain

AU - Jensen, Mads

AU - Hyder, Rasha

AU - Штыров, Юрий Юрьевич

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Neural processing of language is still among the most poorly understood functions of the human brain, whereas a need to objectively assess the neurocongitve status of the language function in a participant-friendly and noninvasive fashion arises in various situations. Here, we propose a solution for this based on a short task-free recording of MEG responses to a set of spoken linguistic contrasts. We used spoken stimuli that diverged lexically (words/pseudowords), semantically (action-related/abstract) or morphosyntactically (grammatically correct/ungrammatical). Based on beamformer source reconstruction we investigated inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC) in five canonical bands (alpha, beta, and low, medium and high gamma) using multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA). Using this approach, we could successfully classify brain responses to meaningful words from meaningless pseudowords, correct from incorrect syntax, as well as semantic differences. The best classification results indicated distributed patterns of activity dominated by core temporofrontal language circuits and complemented by other areas. They varied between the different neurolinguistic properties across frequency bands, with lexical processes classified predominantly by broad gamma, semantic distinctions - by alpha and beta, and syntax - by low gamma feature patterns. Crucially, all types of processing commenced in a near-parallel fashion from similar to 100 ms after the auditory information allowed for disambiguating the spoken input. This shows that individual neurolinguistic properties take place simultaneously and involve overlapping yet distinct neuronal networks that operate at different frequency bands. This brings further hope that brain imaging can be used to assess neurolinguistic processes objectively and noninvasively in a range of populations.

AB - Neural processing of language is still among the most poorly understood functions of the human brain, whereas a need to objectively assess the neurocongitve status of the language function in a participant-friendly and noninvasive fashion arises in various situations. Here, we propose a solution for this based on a short task-free recording of MEG responses to a set of spoken linguistic contrasts. We used spoken stimuli that diverged lexically (words/pseudowords), semantically (action-related/abstract) or morphosyntactically (grammatically correct/ungrammatical). Based on beamformer source reconstruction we investigated inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC) in five canonical bands (alpha, beta, and low, medium and high gamma) using multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA). Using this approach, we could successfully classify brain responses to meaningful words from meaningless pseudowords, correct from incorrect syntax, as well as semantic differences. The best classification results indicated distributed patterns of activity dominated by core temporofrontal language circuits and complemented by other areas. They varied between the different neurolinguistic properties across frequency bands, with lexical processes classified predominantly by broad gamma, semantic distinctions - by alpha and beta, and syntax - by low gamma feature patterns. Crucially, all types of processing commenced in a near-parallel fashion from similar to 100 ms after the auditory information allowed for disambiguating the spoken input. This shows that individual neurolinguistic properties take place simultaneously and involve overlapping yet distinct neuronal networks that operate at different frequency bands. This brings further hope that brain imaging can be used to assess neurolinguistic processes objectively and noninvasively in a range of populations.

KW - CORTICAL MOTOR SYSTEMS

KW - MISMATCH NEGATIVITY

KW - TELL US

KW - OSCILLATIONS

KW - POTENTIALS

KW - SPEECH

KW - GAMMA

KW - COMPREHENSION

KW - INFORMATION

KW - ATTENTION

U2 - 10.1523/ENEURO.0444-18.2019

DO - 10.1523/ENEURO.0444-18.2019

M3 - статья

VL - 6

JO - eNeuro

JF - eNeuro

SN - 2373-2822

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M1 - UNSP ENEURO.0444-18.2019

ER -