Leningradite PbCU3(VO4)2Cl2, a new mineral from volcanic exhalations

L. P. Vergasova, S. K. Filatov, T. F. Semenova, V. V. Anan'yev

Research output

Abstract

Leningradite is the product of fumarole activity in the Great Tolbachik Fissure Eruption. It occurs in relatively small amounts in fumarole incrustations, on the southwestern crest of the second slag cone of the Northern Breakthrough of the eruption, above the vent, where it was deposited in the upper parts of the vugs. The mineral was found both as single poorly faceted red-brown rhomboidal crystals or flakes, or as intergrowths of fine tabular crystals. The crystals and flakes measured a maximum of 0.3 mm across (ordinarily 0.1 mm) in the plane of flattening and were about 0.3 mm thick. The intergrowth aggregates had the appearance of microscopic spheres or globules to 0.6 mm in diameter (usually 0.2 to 0.3 mm), with rough maroon-brown surfaces. Internally, some of the spherical particles resembled spherulites, with the crystals oriented in an orderly fashion from the center to the edges in other cases the crystals were in a spiral arrangement

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)157-160
Number of pages4
JournalDoklady. Earth science sections
Volume310
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1990

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Minerals
Crystals
Vents
Slags
Cones

Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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title = "Leningradite PbCU3(VO4)2Cl2, a new mineral from volcanic exhalations",
abstract = "Leningradite is the product of fumarole activity in the Great Tolbachik Fissure Eruption. It occurs in relatively small amounts in fumarole incrustations, on the southwestern crest of the second slag cone of the Northern Breakthrough of the eruption, above the vent, where it was deposited in the upper parts of the vugs. The mineral was found both as single poorly faceted red-brown rhomboidal crystals or flakes, or as intergrowths of fine tabular crystals. The crystals and flakes measured a maximum of 0.3 mm across (ordinarily 0.1 mm) in the plane of flattening and were about 0.3 mm thick. The intergrowth aggregates had the appearance of microscopic spheres or globules to 0.6 mm in diameter (usually 0.2 to 0.3 mm), with rough maroon-brown surfaces. Internally, some of the spherical particles resembled spherulites, with the crystals oriented in an orderly fashion from the center to the edges in other cases the crystals were in a spiral arrangement",
author = "Vergasova, {L. P.} and Filatov, {S. K.} and Semenova, {T. F.} and Anan'yev, {V. V.}",
year = "1990",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English",
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pages = "157--160",
journal = "DOKLADY OF THE ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE USSR. EARTH SCIENCE SECTIONS",
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}

Leningradite PbCU3(VO4)2Cl2, a new mineral from volcanic exhalations. / Vergasova, L. P.; Filatov, S. K.; Semenova, T. F.; Anan'yev, V. V.

In: Doklady. Earth science sections, Vol. 310, No. 1, 01.01.1990, p. 157-160.

Research output

TY - JOUR

T1 - Leningradite PbCU3(VO4)2Cl2, a new mineral from volcanic exhalations

AU - Vergasova, L. P.

AU - Filatov, S. K.

AU - Semenova, T. F.

AU - Anan'yev, V. V.

PY - 1990/1/1

Y1 - 1990/1/1

N2 - Leningradite is the product of fumarole activity in the Great Tolbachik Fissure Eruption. It occurs in relatively small amounts in fumarole incrustations, on the southwestern crest of the second slag cone of the Northern Breakthrough of the eruption, above the vent, where it was deposited in the upper parts of the vugs. The mineral was found both as single poorly faceted red-brown rhomboidal crystals or flakes, or as intergrowths of fine tabular crystals. The crystals and flakes measured a maximum of 0.3 mm across (ordinarily 0.1 mm) in the plane of flattening and were about 0.3 mm thick. The intergrowth aggregates had the appearance of microscopic spheres or globules to 0.6 mm in diameter (usually 0.2 to 0.3 mm), with rough maroon-brown surfaces. Internally, some of the spherical particles resembled spherulites, with the crystals oriented in an orderly fashion from the center to the edges in other cases the crystals were in a spiral arrangement

AB - Leningradite is the product of fumarole activity in the Great Tolbachik Fissure Eruption. It occurs in relatively small amounts in fumarole incrustations, on the southwestern crest of the second slag cone of the Northern Breakthrough of the eruption, above the vent, where it was deposited in the upper parts of the vugs. The mineral was found both as single poorly faceted red-brown rhomboidal crystals or flakes, or as intergrowths of fine tabular crystals. The crystals and flakes measured a maximum of 0.3 mm across (ordinarily 0.1 mm) in the plane of flattening and were about 0.3 mm thick. The intergrowth aggregates had the appearance of microscopic spheres or globules to 0.6 mm in diameter (usually 0.2 to 0.3 mm), with rough maroon-brown surfaces. Internally, some of the spherical particles resembled spherulites, with the crystals oriented in an orderly fashion from the center to the edges in other cases the crystals were in a spiral arrangement

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