In vivo voltammetric evidence that locus coeruleus activation predominantly releases norepinephrine in the infralimbic cortex: Effect of acute ethanol

Alex L. Deal, Maria A. Mikhailova, Valentina P. Grinevich, Jeff L. Weiner, Raul R. Gainetdinov, Evgeny A. Budygin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

The prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays a critical role in the control of many physiological processes including attention, learning and decision making (Dalley, Cardinal, & Robbins, 2004; Arnsten & Li, 2005; Funahashi & Andreau, 2013). This brain region receives dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) axons from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and locus coeruleus (LC), respectively (Waterhouse, Lin, Burne, & Woodward, 1983; Chandler, Lamperski, & Waterhouse, 2013). Therefore, revealing alterations in catecholamine (CA) dynamics in these circuitries is necessary to understand the pathogenesis of different psychiatric diseases, including addiction to drugs and alcohol. Since the PFC is widely involved in complex mental functions, ethanol-induced neuroadaptations can be implicated in impaired cognitive ability and aversive outcomes that facilitate dependence on alcohol. However, changes in cortical CA release under ethanol effects remain unclear. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere22080
JournalSynapse
Volume73
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Keywords

  • catecholamines
  • ethanol
  • locus coeruleus
  • prefrontal cortex
  • voltammetry

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