Hox-genes in the ontogenesis of polychaetes

Research output

Abstract

The basic plane and evolution of bilateral animals (Bilateria) are closely associated with Hox-genes. These genes usually exist in the genome in the form of clusters, gene complexes with a conservative position of individual genes inside them. These genes encode transcription factors containing a homeodomain, and their expression is ordered along the main body axis in accordance with the rule of colinearity. This means that the position of a gene in the cluster determines its spatial and, sometimes, temporal expression in the embryo. In vertebrates and arthropods, which are studied in most detail, Hoxgenes define the morphological distinction between different regions of the body (tagmas). Boundaries of Hox-genes expression often coincide with the borders of tagmas. In addition, these genes also function in adult organisms, where they are involved in regeneration processes and the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. In recent years, there has been an surge of interest in the study of Hox-genes in animals that are not traditional models of molecular biology. Polychaetes are the most intriguing objects of such studies. They belong to a poorly studied evolutionary branch of Bilateria, the Lophotrochozoa, which is enough to make them attractive for both molecular and developmental biologists. Among polychaetes, there are both families with morphologically specialized segments grouped into tagmas (Chaetopteridae) and families with numerous identical segments (Nereididae). There are polychaete species with impressive abilities to regeneration of the head and the tail and those incapable of regeneration at all. In addition, the life cycle of polychaetes often includes the larva, which may be essentially different from an adult worm. How do the Hox-genes work in so different systems? Can we compare some of their functions with those of homologous genes in insects and vertebrates? What is their place in the hierarchy of molecular regulators controlling developmental processes in polychaetes? If we answer these questions, many pieces of the jigsaw puzzle representing the earliest evolution of bilaterian animals would fall into place. In this review, I present an up-to-date information about Hoxgenes in polychaetes and make some cautious assumptions about the ancestral functions of the Hox-cluster.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Marine Biology
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages73-108
Number of pages36
Volume3
ISBN (Electronic)9781536130935
ISBN (Print)9781536130928
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

Homeobox Genes
Polychaeta
ontogeny
Regeneration
Multigene Family
Vertebrates
genes
Insect Genes
Genes
Body Regions
Gene Order
Arthropods
Life Cycle Stages
multigene family
Larva
Tail
Molecular Biology
animals
Homeostasis
Transcription Factors

Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Kulakova, M. A. (2018). Hox-genes in the ontogenesis of polychaetes. In Advances in Marine Biology (Vol. 3, pp. 73-108). Nova Science Publishers, Inc..
Kulakova, Milana A. / Hox-genes in the ontogenesis of polychaetes. Advances in Marine Biology. Vol. 3 Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2018. pp. 73-108
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Kulakova, MA 2018, Hox-genes in the ontogenesis of polychaetes. in Advances in Marine Biology. vol. 3, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., pp. 73-108.

Hox-genes in the ontogenesis of polychaetes. / Kulakova, Milana A.

Advances in Marine Biology. Vol. 3 Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2018. p. 73-108.

Research output

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Kulakova MA. Hox-genes in the ontogenesis of polychaetes. In Advances in Marine Biology. Vol. 3. Nova Science Publishers, Inc. 2018. p. 73-108