Glycation of Plant Proteins under Environmental Stress - Methodological Approaches, Potential Mechanisms and Biological Role

Tatiana Bilova, Uta Greifenhagen, Gagan Paudel, Elena Lukasheva, Dominic Brauch, Natalia Osmolovskaya, Elena Tarakhovskaya, Gerd Ulrich Balcke, Alain Tissier, Thomas Vogt, Carsten Milkowski, Claudia Birkemeyer, Ludger Wessjohann, Andrej Frolov

Research output

Abstract

Environmental stress is one of the major factors reducing crop productivity. Due to the oncoming climate changes, the effects of drought and high light on plants play an increasing role in modern agriculture. These changes are accompanied with a progressing contamination of soils with heavy metals. Independent of their nature, environmental alterations result in development of oxidative stress, i.e. increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) contents, and metabolic adjustment, i.e. accumulation of soluble primary metabolites (amino acids and sugars). However, a simultaneous increase of ROS and sugar concentrations ultimately results in protein glycation, i.e. non-enzymatic interaction of reducing sugars or their degradation products (alpha-dicarbonyls) with proteins. The eventually resulting advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are known to be toxic and pro-inflammatory in mammals. Recently, their presence was unambiguously demonstrated in vivo in stressed Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Currently, information on protein targets, modification sites therein, mediators and mechanisms of plant glycation are being intensively studied. In this chapter, we comprehensively review the methodological approaches for plant glycation research and discuss potential mechanisms of AGE formation under stress conditions. On the basis of these patterns and additional in vitro experiments, the pathways and mechanisms of plant glycation can be proposed.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationABIOTIC AND BIOTIC STRESS IN PLANTS - RECENT ADVANCES AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES
EditorsAK Shanker, C Shanker
PublisherInTech
Pages295-316
Number of pages22
ISBN (Print)978-953-51-2250-0
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

glycation
plant proteins
reactive oxygen species
amino sugars
proteins
soil pollution
reducing sugars
heavy metals
oxidative stress
Arabidopsis thaliana
drought
climate change
mammals
metabolites
agriculture
sugars
amino acids
degradation
crops

Cite this

Bilova, T., Greifenhagen, U., Paudel, G., Lukasheva, E., Brauch, D., Osmolovskaya, N., ... Frolov, A. (2016). Glycation of Plant Proteins under Environmental Stress - Methodological Approaches, Potential Mechanisms and Biological Role. In AK. Shanker, & C. Shanker (Eds.), ABIOTIC AND BIOTIC STRESS IN PLANTS - RECENT ADVANCES AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES (pp. 295-316). InTech. https://doi.org/10.5772/61860, https://doi.org/10.5772/61860
Bilova, Tatiana ; Greifenhagen, Uta ; Paudel, Gagan ; Lukasheva, Elena ; Brauch, Dominic ; Osmolovskaya, Natalia ; Tarakhovskaya, Elena ; Balcke, Gerd Ulrich ; Tissier, Alain ; Vogt, Thomas ; Milkowski, Carsten ; Birkemeyer, Claudia ; Wessjohann, Ludger ; Frolov, Andrej. / Glycation of Plant Proteins under Environmental Stress - Methodological Approaches, Potential Mechanisms and Biological Role. ABIOTIC AND BIOTIC STRESS IN PLANTS - RECENT ADVANCES AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES. editor / AK Shanker ; C Shanker. InTech, 2016. pp. 295-316
@inbook{c4e7311bb8404a858e9e0671cf783b4e,
title = "Glycation of Plant Proteins under Environmental Stress - Methodological Approaches, Potential Mechanisms and Biological Role",
abstract = "Environmental stress is one of the major factors reducing crop productivity. Due to the oncoming climate changes, the effects of drought and high light on plants play an increasing role in modern agriculture. These changes are accompanied with a progressing contamination of soils with heavy metals. Independent of their nature, environmental alterations result in development of oxidative stress, i.e. increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) contents, and metabolic adjustment, i.e. accumulation of soluble primary metabolites (amino acids and sugars). However, a simultaneous increase of ROS and sugar concentrations ultimately results in protein glycation, i.e. non-enzymatic interaction of reducing sugars or their degradation products (alpha-dicarbonyls) with proteins. The eventually resulting advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are known to be toxic and pro-inflammatory in mammals. Recently, their presence was unambiguously demonstrated in vivo in stressed Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Currently, information on protein targets, modification sites therein, mediators and mechanisms of plant glycation are being intensively studied. In this chapter, we comprehensively review the methodological approaches for plant glycation research and discuss potential mechanisms of AGE formation under stress conditions. On the basis of these patterns and additional in vitro experiments, the pathways and mechanisms of plant glycation can be proposed.",
keywords = "Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), Ageing, Environmental stress, Glycation, Proteomics",
author = "Tatiana Bilova and Uta Greifenhagen and Gagan Paudel and Elena Lukasheva and Dominic Brauch and Natalia Osmolovskaya and Elena Tarakhovskaya and Balcke, {Gerd Ulrich} and Alain Tissier and Thomas Vogt and Carsten Milkowski and Claudia Birkemeyer and Ludger Wessjohann and Andrej Frolov",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.5772/61860",
language = "Английский",
isbn = "978-953-51-2250-0",
pages = "295--316",
editor = "AK Shanker and C Shanker",
booktitle = "ABIOTIC AND BIOTIC STRESS IN PLANTS - RECENT ADVANCES AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES",
publisher = "InTech",
address = "Великобритания",

}

Bilova, T, Greifenhagen, U, Paudel, G, Lukasheva, E, Brauch, D, Osmolovskaya, N, Tarakhovskaya, E, Balcke, GU, Tissier, A, Vogt, T, Milkowski, C, Birkemeyer, C, Wessjohann, L & Frolov, A 2016, Glycation of Plant Proteins under Environmental Stress - Methodological Approaches, Potential Mechanisms and Biological Role. in AK Shanker & C Shanker (eds), ABIOTIC AND BIOTIC STRESS IN PLANTS - RECENT ADVANCES AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES. InTech, pp. 295-316. https://doi.org/10.5772/61860, https://doi.org/10.5772/61860

Glycation of Plant Proteins under Environmental Stress - Methodological Approaches, Potential Mechanisms and Biological Role. / Bilova, Tatiana; Greifenhagen, Uta; Paudel, Gagan; Lukasheva, Elena; Brauch, Dominic; Osmolovskaya, Natalia; Tarakhovskaya, Elena; Balcke, Gerd Ulrich; Tissier, Alain; Vogt, Thomas; Milkowski, Carsten; Birkemeyer, Claudia; Wessjohann, Ludger; Frolov, Andrej.

ABIOTIC AND BIOTIC STRESS IN PLANTS - RECENT ADVANCES AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES. ed. / AK Shanker; C Shanker. InTech, 2016. p. 295-316.

Research output

TY - CHAP

T1 - Glycation of Plant Proteins under Environmental Stress - Methodological Approaches, Potential Mechanisms and Biological Role

AU - Bilova, Tatiana

AU - Greifenhagen, Uta

AU - Paudel, Gagan

AU - Lukasheva, Elena

AU - Brauch, Dominic

AU - Osmolovskaya, Natalia

AU - Tarakhovskaya, Elena

AU - Balcke, Gerd Ulrich

AU - Tissier, Alain

AU - Vogt, Thomas

AU - Milkowski, Carsten

AU - Birkemeyer, Claudia

AU - Wessjohann, Ludger

AU - Frolov, Andrej

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Environmental stress is one of the major factors reducing crop productivity. Due to the oncoming climate changes, the effects of drought and high light on plants play an increasing role in modern agriculture. These changes are accompanied with a progressing contamination of soils with heavy metals. Independent of their nature, environmental alterations result in development of oxidative stress, i.e. increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) contents, and metabolic adjustment, i.e. accumulation of soluble primary metabolites (amino acids and sugars). However, a simultaneous increase of ROS and sugar concentrations ultimately results in protein glycation, i.e. non-enzymatic interaction of reducing sugars or their degradation products (alpha-dicarbonyls) with proteins. The eventually resulting advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are known to be toxic and pro-inflammatory in mammals. Recently, their presence was unambiguously demonstrated in vivo in stressed Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Currently, information on protein targets, modification sites therein, mediators and mechanisms of plant glycation are being intensively studied. In this chapter, we comprehensively review the methodological approaches for plant glycation research and discuss potential mechanisms of AGE formation under stress conditions. On the basis of these patterns and additional in vitro experiments, the pathways and mechanisms of plant glycation can be proposed.

AB - Environmental stress is one of the major factors reducing crop productivity. Due to the oncoming climate changes, the effects of drought and high light on plants play an increasing role in modern agriculture. These changes are accompanied with a progressing contamination of soils with heavy metals. Independent of their nature, environmental alterations result in development of oxidative stress, i.e. increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) contents, and metabolic adjustment, i.e. accumulation of soluble primary metabolites (amino acids and sugars). However, a simultaneous increase of ROS and sugar concentrations ultimately results in protein glycation, i.e. non-enzymatic interaction of reducing sugars or their degradation products (alpha-dicarbonyls) with proteins. The eventually resulting advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are known to be toxic and pro-inflammatory in mammals. Recently, their presence was unambiguously demonstrated in vivo in stressed Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Currently, information on protein targets, modification sites therein, mediators and mechanisms of plant glycation are being intensively studied. In this chapter, we comprehensively review the methodological approaches for plant glycation research and discuss potential mechanisms of AGE formation under stress conditions. On the basis of these patterns and additional in vitro experiments, the pathways and mechanisms of plant glycation can be proposed.

KW - Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs)

KW - Ageing

KW - Environmental stress

KW - Glycation

KW - Proteomics

U2 - 10.5772/61860

DO - 10.5772/61860

M3 - глава/раздел

SN - 978-953-51-2250-0

SP - 295

EP - 316

BT - ABIOTIC AND BIOTIC STRESS IN PLANTS - RECENT ADVANCES AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES

A2 - Shanker, AK

A2 - Shanker, C

PB - InTech

ER -

Bilova T, Greifenhagen U, Paudel G, Lukasheva E, Brauch D, Osmolovskaya N et al. Glycation of Plant Proteins under Environmental Stress - Methodological Approaches, Potential Mechanisms and Biological Role. In Shanker AK, Shanker C, editors, ABIOTIC AND BIOTIC STRESS IN PLANTS - RECENT ADVANCES AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES. InTech. 2016. p. 295-316 https://doi.org/10.5772/61860, https://doi.org/10.5772/61860