Fine-resolution analysis of exoplanetary distributions by wavelets: hints of an overshooting iceline accumulation

Research output

Abstract

We investigate 1D exoplanetary distributions using a novel analysis algorithm based on the continuous wavelet transform. The analysis pipeline includes an estimation of the wavelet transform of the probability density function (p.d.f.) without pre-binning, use of optimized wavelets, a rigorous significance testing of the patterns revealed in the p.d.f., and an optimized minimum-noise reconstruction of the p.d.f. via matching pursuit iterations.

In the distribution of orbital periods, P, our analysis revealed a narrow subfamily of exoplanets within the broad family of "warm Jupiters", or massive giants with P greater than or similar to 300 d, which are often deemed to be related with the iceline accumulation in a protoplanetary disk. We detected a p.d.f. pattern that represents an upturn followed by an overshooting peak spanning P similar to 300-600 d, right beyond the "period valley". It is separated from the other planets by p.d.f. concavities from both sides. It has at least 2-sigma significance.

In the distribution of planet radii, R, and using the California Kepler Survey sample properly cleaned, we confirm the hints of a bimodality with two peaks about R =1.3 R-circle plus and R = 2.4 R-circle plus, and the "evaporation valley" between them. However, we obtain just a modest significance for this pattern, 2-sigma only at the best. Besides, our follow-up application of the Hartigan and Hartigan dip test for unimodality returns 3 per cent false alarm probability (merely 2.2-sigma significance), contrary to 0.14 per cent (or 3.2-sigma), as claimed by Fulton et al. (2017).
Original languageEnglish
Article number192
JournalAstrophysics and Space Science
Volume363
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2018

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probability density function
probability density functions
wavelet
wavelet analysis
valleys
planets
transform
planet
concavity
valley
protoplanetary disks
false alarms
extrasolar planets
Jupiter (planet)
Jupiter
iteration
dip
evaporation
analysis
distribution

Cite this

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title = "Fine-resolution analysis of exoplanetary distributions by wavelets: hints of an overshooting iceline accumulation",
abstract = "We investigate 1D exoplanetary distributions using a novel analysis algorithm based on the continuous wavelet transform. The analysis pipeline includes an estimation of the wavelet transform of the probability density function (p.d.f.) without pre-binning, use of optimized wavelets, a rigorous significance testing of the patterns revealed in the p.d.f., and an optimized minimum-noise reconstruction of the p.d.f. via matching pursuit iterations. In the distribution of orbital periods, P, our analysis revealed a narrow subfamily of exoplanets within the broad family of {"}warm Jupiters{"}, or massive giants with P greater than or similar to 300 d, which are often deemed to be related with the iceline accumulation in a protoplanetary disk. We detected a p.d.f. pattern that represents an upturn followed by an overshooting peak spanning P similar to 300-600 d, right beyond the {"}period valley{"}. It is separated from the other planets by p.d.f. concavities from both sides. It has at least 2-sigma significance. In the distribution of planet radii, R, and using the California Kepler Survey sample properly cleaned, we confirm the hints of a bimodality with two peaks about R =1.3 R-circle plus and R = 2.4 R-circle plus, and the {"}evaporation valley{"} between them. However, we obtain just a modest significance for this pattern, 2-sigma only at the best. Besides, our follow-up application of the Hartigan and Hartigan dip test for unimodality returns 3 per cent false alarm probability (merely 2.2-sigma significance), contrary to 0.14 per cent (or 3.2-sigma), as claimed by Fulton et al. (2017).",
author = "Baluev, {Roman V.} and Shaidulin, {Vakhit S.}",
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N2 - We investigate 1D exoplanetary distributions using a novel analysis algorithm based on the continuous wavelet transform. The analysis pipeline includes an estimation of the wavelet transform of the probability density function (p.d.f.) without pre-binning, use of optimized wavelets, a rigorous significance testing of the patterns revealed in the p.d.f., and an optimized minimum-noise reconstruction of the p.d.f. via matching pursuit iterations. In the distribution of orbital periods, P, our analysis revealed a narrow subfamily of exoplanets within the broad family of "warm Jupiters", or massive giants with P greater than or similar to 300 d, which are often deemed to be related with the iceline accumulation in a protoplanetary disk. We detected a p.d.f. pattern that represents an upturn followed by an overshooting peak spanning P similar to 300-600 d, right beyond the "period valley". It is separated from the other planets by p.d.f. concavities from both sides. It has at least 2-sigma significance. In the distribution of planet radii, R, and using the California Kepler Survey sample properly cleaned, we confirm the hints of a bimodality with two peaks about R =1.3 R-circle plus and R = 2.4 R-circle plus, and the "evaporation valley" between them. However, we obtain just a modest significance for this pattern, 2-sigma only at the best. Besides, our follow-up application of the Hartigan and Hartigan dip test for unimodality returns 3 per cent false alarm probability (merely 2.2-sigma significance), contrary to 0.14 per cent (or 3.2-sigma), as claimed by Fulton et al. (2017).

AB - We investigate 1D exoplanetary distributions using a novel analysis algorithm based on the continuous wavelet transform. The analysis pipeline includes an estimation of the wavelet transform of the probability density function (p.d.f.) without pre-binning, use of optimized wavelets, a rigorous significance testing of the patterns revealed in the p.d.f., and an optimized minimum-noise reconstruction of the p.d.f. via matching pursuit iterations. In the distribution of orbital periods, P, our analysis revealed a narrow subfamily of exoplanets within the broad family of "warm Jupiters", or massive giants with P greater than or similar to 300 d, which are often deemed to be related with the iceline accumulation in a protoplanetary disk. We detected a p.d.f. pattern that represents an upturn followed by an overshooting peak spanning P similar to 300-600 d, right beyond the "period valley". It is separated from the other planets by p.d.f. concavities from both sides. It has at least 2-sigma significance. In the distribution of planet radii, R, and using the California Kepler Survey sample properly cleaned, we confirm the hints of a bimodality with two peaks about R =1.3 R-circle plus and R = 2.4 R-circle plus, and the "evaporation valley" between them. However, we obtain just a modest significance for this pattern, 2-sigma only at the best. Besides, our follow-up application of the Hartigan and Hartigan dip test for unimodality returns 3 per cent false alarm probability (merely 2.2-sigma significance), contrary to 0.14 per cent (or 3.2-sigma), as claimed by Fulton et al. (2017).

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