Far-red light photoadaptations in aquatic cyanobacteria

Research outputpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aquatic ecosystems depend on photosynthetic bacteria that use various strategies of adaptation to light quantity and quality; the qualitative strategies include far-red/near infrared (> 700 nm) light adaptations. The usage of > 700 nm light as energy source is disadvantageous for photosynthesis (long-wavelength quanta are poorer in energy than short-wavelength quanta, and such light is largely screened out by water). Nevertheless, some bacteria produce long-wavelength absorbing "red-shifted" chlorophylls (Chls) that extend the range of photosynthetically active radiation to the infrared region. The majority of cyanobacteria use 400-700 nm light, with excited state being ultimately entrapped by Chl a at a long-wavelength maximal absorbance of similar to 700 nm. This photoadaptation to far-red light was unknown until the discovery of strains producing Chls d and f in 1996 and 2010, respectively. Today, there is much data on cyanobacteria utilizing Chl d as their main pigment and many studies on accessory Chls d and/or f produced under exposure to far-red light. Further analysis of the photosynthetic apparatuses of cyanobacteria that produce red-shifted Chls will contribute to a better understanding of primary productivity in aquatic communities. In this review, we report on the diversity, distribution, physiological ecology, taxonomy and evolution of aquatic cyanobacteria producing red-shifted Chls.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-17
Number of pages17
JournalHydrobiologia
Volume813
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2018

Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science

Cite this

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title = "Far-red light photoadaptations in aquatic cyanobacteria",
abstract = "Aquatic ecosystems depend on photosynthetic bacteria that use various strategies of adaptation to light quantity and quality; the qualitative strategies include far-red/near infrared (> 700 nm) light adaptations. The usage of > 700 nm light as energy source is disadvantageous for photosynthesis (long-wavelength quanta are poorer in energy than short-wavelength quanta, and such light is largely screened out by water). Nevertheless, some bacteria produce long-wavelength absorbing {"}red-shifted{"} chlorophylls (Chls) that extend the range of photosynthetically active radiation to the infrared region. The majority of cyanobacteria use 400-700 nm light, with excited state being ultimately entrapped by Chl a at a long-wavelength maximal absorbance of similar to 700 nm. This photoadaptation to far-red light was unknown until the discovery of strains producing Chls d and f in 1996 and 2010, respectively. Today, there is much data on cyanobacteria utilizing Chl d as their main pigment and many studies on accessory Chls d and/or f produced under exposure to far-red light. Further analysis of the photosynthetic apparatuses of cyanobacteria that produce red-shifted Chls will contribute to a better understanding of primary productivity in aquatic communities. In this review, we report on the diversity, distribution, physiological ecology, taxonomy and evolution of aquatic cyanobacteria producing red-shifted Chls.",
keywords = "Acaryochloris, Chlorophyll d, Chlorophyll f, FaRLiP, Halomicronema hongdechloris, CHLOROPHYLL-D, RESOLVED FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY, F-CONTAINING CYANOBACTERIUM, ACARYOCHLORIS-MARINA, PHOTOSYSTEM-II, ENERGY-TRANSFER, D-DOMINATED CYANOBACTERIUM, PRIMARY ELECTRON-DONOR, HALOMICRONEMA-HONGDECHLORIS, OXYGENIC PHOTOSYNTHETIC PROKARYOTE",
author = "Svetlana Averina and Natalia Velichko and Ekaterina Senatskaya and Alexander Pinevich",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1007/s10750-018-3519-x",
language = "English",
volume = "813",
pages = "1--17",
journal = "Hydrobiologia",
issn = "0018-8158",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Far-red light photoadaptations in aquatic cyanobacteria

AU - Averina, Svetlana

AU - Velichko, Natalia

AU - Senatskaya, Ekaterina

AU - Pinevich, Alexander

PY - 2018/5

Y1 - 2018/5

N2 - Aquatic ecosystems depend on photosynthetic bacteria that use various strategies of adaptation to light quantity and quality; the qualitative strategies include far-red/near infrared (> 700 nm) light adaptations. The usage of > 700 nm light as energy source is disadvantageous for photosynthesis (long-wavelength quanta are poorer in energy than short-wavelength quanta, and such light is largely screened out by water). Nevertheless, some bacteria produce long-wavelength absorbing "red-shifted" chlorophylls (Chls) that extend the range of photosynthetically active radiation to the infrared region. The majority of cyanobacteria use 400-700 nm light, with excited state being ultimately entrapped by Chl a at a long-wavelength maximal absorbance of similar to 700 nm. This photoadaptation to far-red light was unknown until the discovery of strains producing Chls d and f in 1996 and 2010, respectively. Today, there is much data on cyanobacteria utilizing Chl d as their main pigment and many studies on accessory Chls d and/or f produced under exposure to far-red light. Further analysis of the photosynthetic apparatuses of cyanobacteria that produce red-shifted Chls will contribute to a better understanding of primary productivity in aquatic communities. In this review, we report on the diversity, distribution, physiological ecology, taxonomy and evolution of aquatic cyanobacteria producing red-shifted Chls.

AB - Aquatic ecosystems depend on photosynthetic bacteria that use various strategies of adaptation to light quantity and quality; the qualitative strategies include far-red/near infrared (> 700 nm) light adaptations. The usage of > 700 nm light as energy source is disadvantageous for photosynthesis (long-wavelength quanta are poorer in energy than short-wavelength quanta, and such light is largely screened out by water). Nevertheless, some bacteria produce long-wavelength absorbing "red-shifted" chlorophylls (Chls) that extend the range of photosynthetically active radiation to the infrared region. The majority of cyanobacteria use 400-700 nm light, with excited state being ultimately entrapped by Chl a at a long-wavelength maximal absorbance of similar to 700 nm. This photoadaptation to far-red light was unknown until the discovery of strains producing Chls d and f in 1996 and 2010, respectively. Today, there is much data on cyanobacteria utilizing Chl d as their main pigment and many studies on accessory Chls d and/or f produced under exposure to far-red light. Further analysis of the photosynthetic apparatuses of cyanobacteria that produce red-shifted Chls will contribute to a better understanding of primary productivity in aquatic communities. In this review, we report on the diversity, distribution, physiological ecology, taxonomy and evolution of aquatic cyanobacteria producing red-shifted Chls.

KW - Acaryochloris

KW - Chlorophyll d

KW - Chlorophyll f

KW - FaRLiP

KW - Halomicronema hongdechloris

KW - CHLOROPHYLL-D

KW - RESOLVED FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY

KW - F-CONTAINING CYANOBACTERIUM

KW - ACARYOCHLORIS-MARINA

KW - PHOTOSYSTEM-II

KW - ENERGY-TRANSFER

KW - D-DOMINATED CYANOBACTERIUM

KW - PRIMARY ELECTRON-DONOR

KW - HALOMICRONEMA-HONGDECHLORIS

KW - OXYGENIC PHOTOSYNTHETIC PROKARYOTE

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85041137367&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/farred-light-photoadaptations-aquatic-cyanobacteria

U2 - 10.1007/s10750-018-3519-x

DO - 10.1007/s10750-018-3519-x

M3 - Review article

VL - 813

SP - 1

EP - 17

JO - Hydrobiologia

JF - Hydrobiologia

SN - 0018-8158

IS - 1

ER -