Far-red light photoadaptations in aquatic cyanobacteria

Research output

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aquatic ecosystems depend on photosynthetic bacteria that use various strategies of adaptation to light quantity and quality; the qualitative strategies include far-red/near infrared (> 700 nm) light adaptations. The usage of > 700 nm light as energy source is disadvantageous for photosynthesis (long-wavelength quanta are poorer in energy than short-wavelength quanta, and such light is largely screened out by water). Nevertheless, some bacteria produce long-wavelength absorbing "red-shifted" chlorophylls (Chls) that extend the range of photosynthetically active radiation to the infrared region. The majority of cyanobacteria use 400-700 nm light, with excited state being ultimately entrapped by Chl a at a long-wavelength maximal absorbance of similar to 700 nm. This photoadaptation to far-red light was unknown until the discovery of strains producing Chls d and f in 1996 and 2010, respectively. Today, there is much data on cyanobacteria utilizing Chl d as their main pigment and many studies on accessory Chls d and/or f produced under exposure to far-red light. Further analysis of the photosynthetic apparatuses of cyanobacteria that produce red-shifted Chls will contribute to a better understanding of primary productivity in aquatic communities. In this review, we report on the diversity, distribution, physiological ecology, taxonomy and evolution of aquatic cyanobacteria producing red-shifted Chls.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-17
Number of pages17
JournalHydrobiologia
Volume813
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2018

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far-red light
Cyanobacteria
cyanobacterium
chlorophyll
wavelengths
wavelength
aquatic communities
photosynthetic bacteria
ecophysiology
energy
aquatic community
bacterium
photosynthetically active radiation
absorbance
primary productivity
aquatic ecosystem
pigment
pigments
photosynthesis
near infrared

Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science

Cite this

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title = "Far-red light photoadaptations in aquatic cyanobacteria",
abstract = "Aquatic ecosystems depend on photosynthetic bacteria that use various strategies of adaptation to light quantity and quality; the qualitative strategies include far-red/near infrared (> 700 nm) light adaptations. The usage of > 700 nm light as energy source is disadvantageous for photosynthesis (long-wavelength quanta are poorer in energy than short-wavelength quanta, and such light is largely screened out by water). Nevertheless, some bacteria produce long-wavelength absorbing {"}red-shifted{"} chlorophylls (Chls) that extend the range of photosynthetically active radiation to the infrared region. The majority of cyanobacteria use 400-700 nm light, with excited state being ultimately entrapped by Chl a at a long-wavelength maximal absorbance of similar to 700 nm. This photoadaptation to far-red light was unknown until the discovery of strains producing Chls d and f in 1996 and 2010, respectively. Today, there is much data on cyanobacteria utilizing Chl d as their main pigment and many studies on accessory Chls d and/or f produced under exposure to far-red light. Further analysis of the photosynthetic apparatuses of cyanobacteria that produce red-shifted Chls will contribute to a better understanding of primary productivity in aquatic communities. In this review, we report on the diversity, distribution, physiological ecology, taxonomy and evolution of aquatic cyanobacteria producing red-shifted Chls.",
keywords = "Acaryochloris, Chlorophyll d, Chlorophyll f, FaRLiP, Halomicronema hongdechloris, CHLOROPHYLL-D, RESOLVED FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY, F-CONTAINING CYANOBACTERIUM, ACARYOCHLORIS-MARINA, PHOTOSYSTEM-II, ENERGY-TRANSFER, D-DOMINATED CYANOBACTERIUM, PRIMARY ELECTRON-DONOR, HALOMICRONEMA-HONGDECHLORIS, OXYGENIC PHOTOSYNTHETIC PROKARYOTE",
author = "Svetlana Averina and Natalia Velichko and Ekaterina Senatskaya and Alexander Pinevich",
year = "2018",
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T1 - Far-red light photoadaptations in aquatic cyanobacteria

AU - Averina, Svetlana

AU - Velichko, Natalia

AU - Senatskaya, Ekaterina

AU - Pinevich, Alexander

PY - 2018/5

Y1 - 2018/5

N2 - Aquatic ecosystems depend on photosynthetic bacteria that use various strategies of adaptation to light quantity and quality; the qualitative strategies include far-red/near infrared (> 700 nm) light adaptations. The usage of > 700 nm light as energy source is disadvantageous for photosynthesis (long-wavelength quanta are poorer in energy than short-wavelength quanta, and such light is largely screened out by water). Nevertheless, some bacteria produce long-wavelength absorbing "red-shifted" chlorophylls (Chls) that extend the range of photosynthetically active radiation to the infrared region. The majority of cyanobacteria use 400-700 nm light, with excited state being ultimately entrapped by Chl a at a long-wavelength maximal absorbance of similar to 700 nm. This photoadaptation to far-red light was unknown until the discovery of strains producing Chls d and f in 1996 and 2010, respectively. Today, there is much data on cyanobacteria utilizing Chl d as their main pigment and many studies on accessory Chls d and/or f produced under exposure to far-red light. Further analysis of the photosynthetic apparatuses of cyanobacteria that produce red-shifted Chls will contribute to a better understanding of primary productivity in aquatic communities. In this review, we report on the diversity, distribution, physiological ecology, taxonomy and evolution of aquatic cyanobacteria producing red-shifted Chls.

AB - Aquatic ecosystems depend on photosynthetic bacteria that use various strategies of adaptation to light quantity and quality; the qualitative strategies include far-red/near infrared (> 700 nm) light adaptations. The usage of > 700 nm light as energy source is disadvantageous for photosynthesis (long-wavelength quanta are poorer in energy than short-wavelength quanta, and such light is largely screened out by water). Nevertheless, some bacteria produce long-wavelength absorbing "red-shifted" chlorophylls (Chls) that extend the range of photosynthetically active radiation to the infrared region. The majority of cyanobacteria use 400-700 nm light, with excited state being ultimately entrapped by Chl a at a long-wavelength maximal absorbance of similar to 700 nm. This photoadaptation to far-red light was unknown until the discovery of strains producing Chls d and f in 1996 and 2010, respectively. Today, there is much data on cyanobacteria utilizing Chl d as their main pigment and many studies on accessory Chls d and/or f produced under exposure to far-red light. Further analysis of the photosynthetic apparatuses of cyanobacteria that produce red-shifted Chls will contribute to a better understanding of primary productivity in aquatic communities. In this review, we report on the diversity, distribution, physiological ecology, taxonomy and evolution of aquatic cyanobacteria producing red-shifted Chls.

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KW - Chlorophyll d

KW - Chlorophyll f

KW - FaRLiP

KW - Halomicronema hongdechloris

KW - CHLOROPHYLL-D

KW - RESOLVED FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY

KW - F-CONTAINING CYANOBACTERIUM

KW - ACARYOCHLORIS-MARINA

KW - PHOTOSYSTEM-II

KW - ENERGY-TRANSFER

KW - D-DOMINATED CYANOBACTERIUM

KW - PRIMARY ELECTRON-DONOR

KW - HALOMICRONEMA-HONGDECHLORIS

KW - OXYGENIC PHOTOSYNTHETIC PROKARYOTE

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UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/farred-light-photoadaptations-aquatic-cyanobacteria

U2 - 10.1007/s10750-018-3519-x

DO - 10.1007/s10750-018-3519-x

M3 - Review article

AN - SCOPUS:85041137367

VL - 813

SP - 1

EP - 17

JO - Hydrobiologia

JF - Hydrobiologia

SN - 0018-8158

IS - 1

ER -