Evolution of the subsistence pattern of indigenous population of the coast of Southern Chukotka: energy and resources aspects

Research output

10 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The aim of the research was to elucidate the changes in the subsistence patterns in Meinypilgyno village community located in the South of Chukotka on the Bering Sea coast near a spawning area of the large stock of red salmon. The research was based on modern interviews and data of the Polar Census 1926/27. The result was compared with case study of Chukchi pastoralists and Yupik communities made by Igor Krupnik (1983) in northern Chukotka. The population of Meinypilgyno was formed 90 years ago from two indigenous communities with different subsistence patterns and ecologic niches: Chukchi reindeer herders and Kereck fishermen and sea-mammal hunters. The Soviet and post-soviet economic and social reforms combined with Russian immigration changed indigenous life step by step. First, the Kereks blended in with the Chukchi community, and then the Chukchies lost their reindeer husbandry and began to merge with the Russians. Meinypilgyno became biethnic Chukchi-Russian community focused on red salmon fishing. Presently, both ethnic groups use the same ecologic niche. The analyses of the evolution of the subsistence patterns in Meinypilgyno confirms the thesis that two communities with similar subsistence activities using one ecological niche are going either to clash, or to merge together.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication4th International Scientific Conference “Arctic: History and Modernity”
Subtitle of host publicationIOP Conf. Series: Earth and Environmental Science 302 (2019) 012077
Number of pages9
Volume302
Edition1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Aug 2019

Publication series

NameIOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science
PublisherIOP Publishing Ltd.
ISSN (Print)1755-1307

Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Evolution of the subsistence pattern of indigenous population of the coast of Southern Chukotka: energy and resources aspects'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this