Эволюция взглядов Р.Ю. Виппера на историю раннего христианства в первый московский период его жизни (1897-1922 г.).

Translated title of the contribution: Evolution of Robert Vipper’s Opinion of Early Christian History during his First Professorship in Moscow (1897−1922)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The article discusses the development of the opinion of R.Yu. Vipper (1854-1954) on early Christianity. The historian Robert Vipper was an eminent member of the scholarly community of pre-revolutionary Russia and the professor of universal history in Moscow university. He spent the years from 1924 till 1940 in the emigration in Riga, and upon his return to Moscow in 1940 he published a few books and articles on Early Christianity. These would show the clear adherence to the Soviet views on the subject and sometimes this is taken as a manifestation of Vipper’s change of opinion. Whatever may be the case in any other subject of his diverse field of his scholarly interests, Vipper’s views on early Christian history show little, if any, change from the opinions he had professed before his exile. However, if one looks at his previous works that had been published in 1906-1918, it becomes perfectly obvious that key points of Vipper’s view of early Christianity were already present in this earlier stage of his schol
Translated title of the contributionEvolution of Robert Vipper’s Opinion of Early Christian History during his First Professorship in Moscow (1897−1922)
Original languageRussian
Pages (from-to)1327-1339
Number of pages13
JournalBylye Gody
Volume57
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Political Science and International Relations

Keywords

  • 1900-1918
  • Calvinism
  • Celsus
  • early Christianity
  • history of the scholarship
  • Robert Vipper
  • история науки
  • кальвинизм
  • период 1900-1918
  • Р.Ю. Виппер
  • раннее христианство
  • Цельс

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