Dynamics of parasite community during early ontogenesis of marine threespine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus.

Research output

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hypothesis: Parasite infection of juvenile stickleback increases during their early ontogenesis owing to transmission from adults and other juveniles, as well as changes in diet. Organisms: Threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) aged one week to two months, their ecto- and endoparasites, and their stomach contents. Times and places: July to September 2012 and 2015; two locations in the Kandalaksha Bay of the White Sea – Seldyanaya Inlet with dense seagrass beds and an unnamed lagoon in Sukhaya Salma Inlet. Methods: Quantitative sampling of stickleback at 10 day intervals, and quantitative analysis of their parasites and stomach contents. Results: As sticklebacks grew, their parasite load increased. We identified three size groups of stickleback that differ significantly in their parasite species composition and infection indices: hatchlings 7.0–8.5 mm long were infected with three parasite species (prevalence 43%); juveniles 9–11 mm harboured four or five species (100%); and juveniles 12–30 mm were i
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)335-354
JournalEvolutionary Ecology Research
Volume17
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Gasterosteus aculeatus
ontogeny
Gasterosteidae
parasite
parasites
stomach content
stomach
endoparasite
parasite intensity
parasite load
ectoparasite
endoparasites
group size
ectoparasites
seagrass
infection
quantitative analysis
lagoon
diet
species diversity

Cite this

@article{23a33fc2835a4deda0a49aa30e716262,
title = "Dynamics of parasite community during early ontogenesis of marine threespine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus.",
abstract = "Hypothesis: Parasite infection of juvenile stickleback increases during their early ontogenesis owing to transmission from adults and other juveniles, as well as changes in diet. Organisms: Threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) aged one week to two months, their ecto- and endoparasites, and their stomach contents. Times and places: July to September 2012 and 2015; two locations in the Kandalaksha Bay of the White Sea – Seldyanaya Inlet with dense seagrass beds and an unnamed lagoon in Sukhaya Salma Inlet. Methods: Quantitative sampling of stickleback at 10 day intervals, and quantitative analysis of their parasites and stomach contents. Results: As sticklebacks grew, their parasite load increased. We identified three size groups of stickleback that differ significantly in their parasite species composition and infection indices: hatchlings 7.0–8.5 mm long were infected with three parasite species (prevalence 43{\%}); juveniles 9–11 mm harboured four or five species (100{\%}); and juveniles 12–30 mm were i",
keywords = "feeding, Gasterosteus aculeatus, juveniles, parasites, threespine stickleback, White Sea.",
author = "E.V. Rybkina and A.S. Demchuk and D.L. Lajus and T.S. Ivanova and M.V. Ivanov and K.V. Galaktionov",
year = "2017",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "335--354",
journal = "Evolutionary Ecology Research",
issn = "1522-0613",
publisher = "Evolutionary Ecology Research",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dynamics of parasite community during early ontogenesis of marine threespine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus.

AU - Rybkina, E.V.

AU - Demchuk, A.S.

AU - Lajus, D.L.

AU - Ivanova, T.S.

AU - Ivanov, M.V.

AU - Galaktionov, K.V.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Hypothesis: Parasite infection of juvenile stickleback increases during their early ontogenesis owing to transmission from adults and other juveniles, as well as changes in diet. Organisms: Threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) aged one week to two months, their ecto- and endoparasites, and their stomach contents. Times and places: July to September 2012 and 2015; two locations in the Kandalaksha Bay of the White Sea – Seldyanaya Inlet with dense seagrass beds and an unnamed lagoon in Sukhaya Salma Inlet. Methods: Quantitative sampling of stickleback at 10 day intervals, and quantitative analysis of their parasites and stomach contents. Results: As sticklebacks grew, their parasite load increased. We identified three size groups of stickleback that differ significantly in their parasite species composition and infection indices: hatchlings 7.0–8.5 mm long were infected with three parasite species (prevalence 43%); juveniles 9–11 mm harboured four or five species (100%); and juveniles 12–30 mm were i

AB - Hypothesis: Parasite infection of juvenile stickleback increases during their early ontogenesis owing to transmission from adults and other juveniles, as well as changes in diet. Organisms: Threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) aged one week to two months, their ecto- and endoparasites, and their stomach contents. Times and places: July to September 2012 and 2015; two locations in the Kandalaksha Bay of the White Sea – Seldyanaya Inlet with dense seagrass beds and an unnamed lagoon in Sukhaya Salma Inlet. Methods: Quantitative sampling of stickleback at 10 day intervals, and quantitative analysis of their parasites and stomach contents. Results: As sticklebacks grew, their parasite load increased. We identified three size groups of stickleback that differ significantly in their parasite species composition and infection indices: hatchlings 7.0–8.5 mm long were infected with three parasite species (prevalence 43%); juveniles 9–11 mm harboured four or five species (100%); and juveniles 12–30 mm were i

KW - feeding

KW - Gasterosteus aculeatus

KW - juveniles

KW - parasites

KW - threespine stickleback

KW - White Sea.

M3 - Article

VL - 17

SP - 335

EP - 354

JO - Evolutionary Ecology Research

JF - Evolutionary Ecology Research

SN - 1522-0613

ER -