Demographic and economic disparities among Arctic regions

J.I. Schmidt, M. Aanesen, K.B. Klokov, S. Khrutschev, V.H. Hausner

Research output

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We use demographic and economic indicators to analyze spatial differences and temporal trends across 18 regions surrounding the Arctic Ocean. Multifactor and cluster analysis were used on 10 indicators reflecting income, employment and demography from 1995 to 2008. The main difference is between regions with high population densities, low natural growth rate, and low unemployment (Russia, Norway and Iceland) and regions with high unemployment rate and high natural growth rate (mainly North American regions). However, once those parameters were accounted for sub-regional differences start to emerge. Variation among the regions was a result of national policies and regional differences such as access and presence of natural resources (i.e. oil, gas, mining, etc.). We found only weak temporal trends, but regions with resource extraction show some signs of higher volatility. Overall, the Arctic has experienced out-migration with only Iceland and two regions in Canada experiencing in-migration.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)251-270
JournalPolar Geography
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Arctic Regions
Iceland
unemployment
Unemployment
Arctic
Arctic region
demographic statistics
Economics
Demography
economic indicators
economics
Spatial Analysis
Volatilization
Russia
Emigration and Immigration
Temporal Lobe
Norway
Growth
Population Density
demography

Cite this

Schmidt, J. I., Aanesen, M., Klokov, K. B., Khrutschev, S., & Hausner, V. H. (2015). Demographic and economic disparities among Arctic regions. Polar Geography, 38(4), 251-270. https://doi.org/10.1080/1088937X.2015.1065926
Schmidt, J.I. ; Aanesen, M. ; Klokov, K.B. ; Khrutschev, S. ; Hausner, V.H. / Demographic and economic disparities among Arctic regions. In: Polar Geography. 2015 ; Vol. 38, No. 4. pp. 251-270.
@article{94ae058e03e64fcb9170cb564b2b1afb,
title = "Demographic and economic disparities among Arctic regions",
abstract = "We use demographic and economic indicators to analyze spatial differences and temporal trends across 18 regions surrounding the Arctic Ocean. Multifactor and cluster analysis were used on 10 indicators reflecting income, employment and demography from 1995 to 2008. The main difference is between regions with high population densities, low natural growth rate, and low unemployment (Russia, Norway and Iceland) and regions with high unemployment rate and high natural growth rate (mainly North American regions). However, once those parameters were accounted for sub-regional differences start to emerge. Variation among the regions was a result of national policies and regional differences such as access and presence of natural resources (i.e. oil, gas, mining, etc.). We found only weak temporal trends, but regions with resource extraction show some signs of higher volatility. Overall, the Arctic has experienced out-migration with only Iceland and two regions in Canada experiencing in-migration.",
author = "J.I. Schmidt and M. Aanesen and K.B. Klokov and S. Khrutschev and V.H. Hausner",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1080/1088937X.2015.1065926",
language = "English",
volume = "38",
pages = "251--270",
journal = "Polar Geography",
issn = "1088-937X",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "4",

}

Schmidt, JI, Aanesen, M, Klokov, KB, Khrutschev, S & Hausner, VH 2015, 'Demographic and economic disparities among Arctic regions', Polar Geography, vol. 38, no. 4, pp. 251-270. https://doi.org/10.1080/1088937X.2015.1065926

Demographic and economic disparities among Arctic regions. / Schmidt, J.I.; Aanesen, M.; Klokov, K.B.; Khrutschev, S.; Hausner, V.H.

In: Polar Geography, Vol. 38, No. 4, 2015, p. 251-270.

Research output

TY - JOUR

T1 - Demographic and economic disparities among Arctic regions

AU - Schmidt, J.I.

AU - Aanesen, M.

AU - Klokov, K.B.

AU - Khrutschev, S.

AU - Hausner, V.H.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - We use demographic and economic indicators to analyze spatial differences and temporal trends across 18 regions surrounding the Arctic Ocean. Multifactor and cluster analysis were used on 10 indicators reflecting income, employment and demography from 1995 to 2008. The main difference is between regions with high population densities, low natural growth rate, and low unemployment (Russia, Norway and Iceland) and regions with high unemployment rate and high natural growth rate (mainly North American regions). However, once those parameters were accounted for sub-regional differences start to emerge. Variation among the regions was a result of national policies and regional differences such as access and presence of natural resources (i.e. oil, gas, mining, etc.). We found only weak temporal trends, but regions with resource extraction show some signs of higher volatility. Overall, the Arctic has experienced out-migration with only Iceland and two regions in Canada experiencing in-migration.

AB - We use demographic and economic indicators to analyze spatial differences and temporal trends across 18 regions surrounding the Arctic Ocean. Multifactor and cluster analysis were used on 10 indicators reflecting income, employment and demography from 1995 to 2008. The main difference is between regions with high population densities, low natural growth rate, and low unemployment (Russia, Norway and Iceland) and regions with high unemployment rate and high natural growth rate (mainly North American regions). However, once those parameters were accounted for sub-regional differences start to emerge. Variation among the regions was a result of national policies and regional differences such as access and presence of natural resources (i.e. oil, gas, mining, etc.). We found only weak temporal trends, but regions with resource extraction show some signs of higher volatility. Overall, the Arctic has experienced out-migration with only Iceland and two regions in Canada experiencing in-migration.

U2 - 10.1080/1088937X.2015.1065926

DO - 10.1080/1088937X.2015.1065926

M3 - Article

VL - 38

SP - 251

EP - 270

JO - Polar Geography

JF - Polar Geography

SN - 1088-937X

IS - 4

ER -