Between migrationism and autochtonism: On the origin of transcarpathian Rusins in the discursive space of the national narrative

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

By the mid-19th century the Carpatho-Rusin historiography had formed two basic concepts of the origin of the Rusin population living in the Hungarian Kingdom: migrationism, which connected the first appearance of the Rusins in the future Hungarian territory with the Hungarian migration to the Carpathian Basin at the end of the 9th century, and autochthonism, which claimed that the Rusins or their immediate ancestors had settled there long before the migration of the Magyars. While migrationism was based on the medieval written source - the anonimous Gesta Hungarorum (circa 1200), autochtonistic concept appeared due to the development of proto-national discourse in Europe and reflected the orientation of Rusin authors to modern historiography. There was a contradiction between the autochtonistic discourse of the Rusin origins and the notion of the Scandinavian origin of the name "Rus" developed in the critical historiography. This contradiction was resolved in the Rusin historiography in the second half of the 19th century by means of the theory that the Hungarian Rusins originate from the "Rusin" (that is East Slavic) tribe of White Croats, who were subjugated by Kiev in the 10th century. As a result, the autochtonistic concept has stood the test of time and become an important element of the Rusin national historical narrative.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)179-197
Number of pages19
JournalRusin
Volume50
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017

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historiography
narrative
migration
Croat
discourse
basic concept
ethnic group
Discursive
National Narrative
Pannonian Rusyns
Historiography

Scopus subject areas

  • History

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abstract = "By the mid-19th century the Carpatho-Rusin historiography had formed two basic concepts of the origin of the Rusin population living in the Hungarian Kingdom: migrationism, which connected the first appearance of the Rusins in the future Hungarian territory with the Hungarian migration to the Carpathian Basin at the end of the 9th century, and autochthonism, which claimed that the Rusins or their immediate ancestors had settled there long before the migration of the Magyars. While migrationism was based on the medieval written source - the anonimous Gesta Hungarorum (circa 1200), autochtonistic concept appeared due to the development of proto-national discourse in Europe and reflected the orientation of Rusin authors to modern historiography. There was a contradiction between the autochtonistic discourse of the Rusin origins and the notion of the Scandinavian origin of the name {"}Rus{"} developed in the critical historiography. This contradiction was resolved in the Rusin historiography in the second half of the 19th century by means of the theory that the Hungarian Rusins originate from the {"}Rusin{"} (that is East Slavic) tribe of White Croats, who were subjugated by Kiev in the 10th century. As a result, the autochtonistic concept has stood the test of time and become an important element of the Rusin national historical narrative.",
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