Atomic nature of the high anisotropy of borate thermal expansion

S.K. Filatov, R.S. Bubnova

Research output

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One of the unique features of borate crystals is that, on heating, a majority of them exhibit a strong anisotropy of thermal deformations along some directions in the crystal structure. There may even be negative thermal expansion (i.e. contraction on heating) in some directions. An explanation of this phenomenon is suggested in the present work. The contribution of the three main components of such anisotropy is analysed. These three components are shear deformations, hinge deformations and anisotropic thermal vibrations of atoms, which are well known in the theory of the thermal behaviour of crystalline compounds. The co-occurrence of all three components in borates is what makes their anisotropic thermal deformations record breaking. Oxygen compounds of other classes, e.g. silicates, carbonates, etc., are considered from the same perspectives.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)24-35
JournalPhysics and Chemistry of Glasses: European Journal of Glass Science and Technology Part B
Volume56
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Borates
Anisotropy
Oxygen Compounds
borates
Heating
Silicates
anisotropy
expansion
Carbonates
Shear deformation
oxygen compounds
heating
Crystal structure
Crystalline materials
Atoms
Crystals
Oxygen
thermal expansion
silicates
carbonates

Cite this

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title = "Atomic nature of the high anisotropy of borate thermal expansion",
abstract = "One of the unique features of borate crystals is that, on heating, a majority of them exhibit a strong anisotropy of thermal deformations along some directions in the crystal structure. There may even be negative thermal expansion (i.e. contraction on heating) in some directions. An explanation of this phenomenon is suggested in the present work. The contribution of the three main components of such anisotropy is analysed. These three components are shear deformations, hinge deformations and anisotropic thermal vibrations of atoms, which are well known in the theory of the thermal behaviour of crystalline compounds. The co-occurrence of all three components in borates is what makes their anisotropic thermal deformations record breaking. Oxygen compounds of other classes, e.g. silicates, carbonates, etc., are considered from the same perspectives.",
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T1 - Atomic nature of the high anisotropy of borate thermal expansion

AU - Filatov, S.K.

AU - Bubnova, R.S.

PY - 2015

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N2 - One of the unique features of borate crystals is that, on heating, a majority of them exhibit a strong anisotropy of thermal deformations along some directions in the crystal structure. There may even be negative thermal expansion (i.e. contraction on heating) in some directions. An explanation of this phenomenon is suggested in the present work. The contribution of the three main components of such anisotropy is analysed. These three components are shear deformations, hinge deformations and anisotropic thermal vibrations of atoms, which are well known in the theory of the thermal behaviour of crystalline compounds. The co-occurrence of all three components in borates is what makes their anisotropic thermal deformations record breaking. Oxygen compounds of other classes, e.g. silicates, carbonates, etc., are considered from the same perspectives.

AB - One of the unique features of borate crystals is that, on heating, a majority of them exhibit a strong anisotropy of thermal deformations along some directions in the crystal structure. There may even be negative thermal expansion (i.e. contraction on heating) in some directions. An explanation of this phenomenon is suggested in the present work. The contribution of the three main components of such anisotropy is analysed. These three components are shear deformations, hinge deformations and anisotropic thermal vibrations of atoms, which are well known in the theory of the thermal behaviour of crystalline compounds. The co-occurrence of all three components in borates is what makes their anisotropic thermal deformations record breaking. Oxygen compounds of other classes, e.g. silicates, carbonates, etc., are considered from the same perspectives.

M3 - Article

VL - 56

SP - 24

EP - 35

JO - European journal of glass science and technology. Part B, Physics and chemistry of glasses

JF - European journal of glass science and technology. Part B, Physics and chemistry of glasses

SN - 1753-3562

IS - 1

ER -