Amyloids and prions in plants: Facts and perspectives

K. S. Antonets, A. A. Nizhnikov

Research output

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Amyloids represent protein fibrils that have highly ordered structure with unique physical and chemical properties. Amyloids have long been considered lethal pathogens that cause dozens of incurable diseases in humans and animals. Recent data show that amyloids may not only possess pathogenic properties but are also implicated in the essential biological processes in a variety of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Functional amyloids have been identified in archaea, bacteria, fungi, and animals, including humans. Plants are one of the most poorly studied groups of organisms in the field of amyloid biology. Although amyloid properties have not been shown under native conditions for any plant protein, studies demonstrating amyloid properties for a set of plant proteins in vitro or in heterologous systems in vivo have been published in recent years. In this review, we systematize the data on the amyloidogenic proteins of plants and their functions and discuss the perspectives of identifying novel amyloids using bioinformatic and proteomic approaches.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)300-312
Number of pages13
JournalPrion
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Sep 2017

Fingerprint

Prions
Amyloid
Amyloidogenic Proteins
Plant Proteins
Animals
Biological Phenomena
Archaea
Pathogens
Bioinformatics
Computational Biology
Eukaryota
Fungi
Proteomics
Chemical properties
Bacteria
Physical properties

Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Cell Biology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Antonets, K. S. ; Nizhnikov, A. A. / Amyloids and prions in plants : Facts and perspectives. In: Prion. 2017 ; Vol. 11, No. 5. pp. 300-312.
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Amyloids and prions in plants : Facts and perspectives. / Antonets, K. S.; Nizhnikov, A. A.

In: Prion, Vol. 11, No. 5, 03.09.2017, p. 300-312.

Research output

TY - JOUR

T1 - Amyloids and prions in plants

T2 - Facts and perspectives

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AU - Nizhnikov, A. A.

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