A modification of the phase-field method to simulate electrohydrodynamic processes in two-phase immiscible liquids and its experimental verification

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Electrohydrodynamic processes in two-phase immiscible liquids include electrical deformation and coalescence. The latter are primary phenomena in electrostatic phase separation and many other technologies, yet represent a rather challenging issue for numerical simulation, especially when electrical conductivities of phases differ significantly. There are several papers in the literature where computations are distorted with a charge “escape” problem when the space charge emerges far from the interface. The article provides a thorough analysis of the issue and suggests a modification of the numerical model. The key idea is in changing the dependence of the electrical conductivity on fluid volume fraction from a linear to the exponential one. To verify the approach, original experimental data were acquired that lacks typical flaws and are suitable for a quantitative comparison. The use of the data confirms the correctness of the modified numerical model.

Original languageEnglish
Article number103483
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Electrostatics
Volume107
Early online dateJun 2020
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2020

Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Biotechnology

Keywords

  • Electrodeformation
  • Experimental data
  • Fluid-fluid interface
  • Interfacial tension
  • Numerical simulation
  • Water-oil emulsion
  • DROPS
  • LEVEL-SET
  • ELECTRIC-FIELD
  • TENSION
  • ELECTROCOALESCENCE
  • COALESCENCE
  • OIL DROPLETS
  • DYNAMICS
  • AGGREGATION
  • WATER DROPLETS

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