Logic lessons for Russia: Kiev's theology and the Russian Enlightenment

Research output

Abstract

The paper argues that the philosophy that was taught in Orthodox schools of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth in late 16th-early 17th century and then became the ideological basis for the Moscow "Latinism" can be attributed to so-called Second scholasticism. The main features of Second scholasticism are the rejection of predestination in theology, usage of probabilistic approaches in logic and ethics and confrontation with absolutism in politics. These features made Second scholasticism unacceptable for absolute monarchies emerging in Europe (including the Russian Empire) which utilized universal rationalism of the early Enlightenment as an ideological basis. Both in Western Europe and in Russia Second scholasticism became "a zone of cultural exclusion". However prevalence of Second scholasticism in Orthodox schools of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth concurred with making up of the Ukrainian cultural originality and in many respects defined characteristic features of the Ukrainian mentality.

Translated title of the contributionУроки логики для России: Киевская теология и русское Просвещение
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)20-32
Number of pages13
JournalRivista di Estetica
Volume67
Issue number67
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2018

Scopus subject areas

  • Philosophy

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