Gender, declension and stem-final consonants: an experimental study of gender agreement in Russian

Research outputpeer-review

Abstract

Every adult native speaker of Russian knows that kon’ is masculine and
lan’ is feminine, although 3rd declension nouns present some difficulties
in the first and second language acquisition. However, will the fact that
these nouns are less frequent than masculine nouns ending in a consonant
or feminine nouns ending in -a/ja play a role for online subject-predicate
agreement processing? Or will subject-predicate agreement processing
be more problematic with subjects of a certain gender? Finally, some final
consonants are more characteristic for feminine gender, while the others
for masculine gender. Are speakers sensitive to this? We present two experiments
addressing these questions. We found that all three factors play
a role, but for different tasks (online agreement processing or determining
the gender of a novel word) and at different processing stages.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationComputational Linguistics and Intellectual Technologies
Pages688-700
Number of pages12
Volume17
ISBN (Electronic)2075-7182
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Scopus subject areas

  • Linguistics and Language
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Слюсарь, Н. А. (2018). Gender, declension and stem-final consonants: an experimental study of gender agreement in Russian. In Computational Linguistics and Intellectual Technologies (Vol. 17, pp. 688-700 )
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Слюсарь, НА 2018, Gender, declension and stem-final consonants: an experimental study of gender agreement in Russian. in Computational Linguistics and Intellectual Technologies. vol. 17, pp. 688-700 .

Gender, declension and stem-final consonants: an experimental study of gender agreement in Russian. / Слюсарь, Наталия Анатольевна.

Computational Linguistics and Intellectual Technologies. Vol. 17 2018. p. 688-700 .

Research outputpeer-review

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Слюсарь НА. Gender, declension and stem-final consonants: an experimental study of gender agreement in Russian. In Computational Linguistics and Intellectual Technologies. Vol. 17. 2018. p. 688-700