Идентитарные процессы в средневековом Уэльсе:Терминология, дискурса и ситуация билингвизма (производные от wēalas определения)

Translated title of the contribution: The Identity processes in Medieval Wales. Terminology, Discourses, and Context of Bilingualism (wēalas-based nomenclature)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The evidence of written records and literary texts reveals a complex network of cultural and linguistic negotiations in Medieval Wales and England, in which the terms of ethnicity and subsequent discourses were formed and furthered. Diglossic combinations played a role of a crucial indicator of binary split between the vernacular and Latin language resources. Bilingualism, which indicates the native viewpoint on ethnicity and occupied territory, is hard to separate from a more general historical context where instead of the absent terms “Wales” and “the Welsh” prevailed the “Britain” and the “Britons”. Aimed at analysis of the semantic field of “Kymry”, the article concentrates on the formation of both the vernacular and Latin discourses and shows how its meaning was crystalized through their interaction. Treating British rhetoric as pervading much of the corpus of vernacular literature, the author underlines that ethnic and territorial definitions became clearer only after an introduction of wēalas-based terminology. Limited to the exterior discourse these clarified meanings were not overriding and did not cross its line.
Translated title of the contributionThe Identity processes in Medieval Wales. Terminology, Discourses, and Context of Bilingualism (wēalas-based nomenclature)
Original languageRussian
Pages (from-to)48-61
JournalДИАЛОГ СО ВРЕМЕНЕМ
Issue number62
StatePublished - 2018

Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

Keywords

  • Medieval Wales
  • Welsh identity
  • Kymry
  • western Britons
  • bilingualism
  • Latin and vernacular discourses

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